Intern Edition Summer 2004
 
 

NPR's Fall 2004 Interns

Morris Bracy
Jessica Coughlin
Charles Foster
Jocelyn Frank
Tania Luma
Marley Magaziner
Christa Marshall
Julie Masis
Leah Morse
Tina Patronas
Clare Robbins
Kathryn Schoendorf
Elise Thatcher
Lisa Venbrux
Odette Yousef


Morris Bracy
Morris Bracy, Washington Desk
Morris Bracy graduated from Temple University this spring with a bachelor's degree in English and is currently student of the Washington Center for Politics and Journalism. Prior to interning at NPR, Morris wrote for the Philadelphia City Paper and the Philadelphia Sunday Sun. He is a Philadelphian to the core.

Morris is an intern at the Washington Desk. While at NPR, Morris worked as a production assistant for the election night broadcast and for the presidential debates. He also was responsible for making those groovy election boards.

back to top
Jessica Coughlin
Jessica Coughlin, Weekend Edition Saturday
Host, Intern Edition Fall '04

Jessica is currently attending George Washington University in Washington, D.C. A native of Boston, MA, she enjoys reading, listening to music, and raucously rooting for the Red Sox. Jessica is majoring in linguistic anthropology and minoring in creative writing. In addition to interning for Weekend Edition Saturday, her other hobbies include parking cars at NASCAR events, restringing beads for middle aged ladies, and going to rock concerts. Jessica's favorite authors are John Updike, Graham Greene, Shakespeare, and J.R.R. Tolkien. Her all time favorite musicians are The Beatles.

For Weekend Edition Saturday, I have had some serious experience with journalism, but moreover, I have had a lot of laughs. Scott Simon and the gang are a pack of totally creative, intelligent, and hilarious pals and I have had a great time learning from them and getting their coffee. Highlights have been meeting John Fogerty of Creedance Clearwater Revival, interviewing the man who invented the Klingon language on Star Trek, and making pies for Scott to throw at Nina Totenberg (with tossing instruction from the real Bozo the Clown).

Jessica's Piece: In Providence, RI, a twenty-three year old optical engineer creates sculpture from a most unlikely material- plastic used to make science goggles. He daily brings science and sculpture together as both an engineer and an artist. Listen

back to top
Charles Foster
Charles Foster, Science Desk

Charles Foster went to Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania where he majored in biology. His concentration was in aquatic ecology and he spent a semester in Denmark studying marine biology. For his senior thesis, Charles studied the effects of a common pollutant on zebra mussel reproduction. While at Gettysburg, he freelanced for a local daily newspaper. He plays the upright bass and listens to a lot of jazz. Charles grew up on Long Island and has five brothers and sisters, one blind French poodle, and two tabby cats. While in Pennsylvania, he worked at a paper in Hanover called The Morning Sun"

Charles is the Science Desk intern. He gets to work in different capacities with the idiosyncratic, funny, and brilliant editors, reporters, and producers who make up the desk. He has learned all sorts of new terminology - logging tape, dubbing into Dalet, doing tape syncs. And he's learned it the hard way. Most of the time, Charles is just glad to be here, and glad that these people put up with him.

Charles' Piece: Charles is doing a story for Intern Edition on the overhaul of D.C.'s recycling program. Listen

back to top
Jocelyn Frank
Jocelyn Frank, Radio Expeditions

Of curly hair and sound spirit, Jocelyn Frank hails from the state of Michigan. After graduating from the University of Michigan with a dual degree she most recently was to be found performing with orchestras throughout the Detroit area. Her studies and quest to connect cultures through the arts led her (quite wonderfully, she might add) to the fantastic position of fall intern for Radio Expeditions with National Public Radio and The National Geographic Society. Since her arrival she has eagerly absorbed as much as possible about the world of radio from many generous mentors in production, sound engineering, reporting and editing. She has met masters of free food, free books, free music, free laughs, perhaps too much free candy and the right amount of thought provoking conversation.

Of course threatened cultures and environments around the world have been her focus with Radio Expeditions and Jocelyn's wrists are tired from writing home to friends and family to share the new topics she encounters daily in her research.

Cultural expression (whether through music, literature, or other arts) and the challenges those expressions face from politics, economics, and the environment are not only a part of her work at NPR but also a cornerstone of what she hopes her life's work will entail.

When not working late at NPR, Jocelyn is mostly found indulging in vegan chocolate, but she also has her heart in all things outdoorsy. Jocelyn is commited to travel, adventure, and living life fully, and is up for the challenge of just about anything.

Jocelyn's Piece: Jocelyn Frank's Intern Edition report examines local and national efforts to address urban need, diversity and the changing face of farmers markets. Listen

back to top

Tania Luma

Tania Luma is senior double major in broadcast journalism and sociology at the University of Maryland. Since freshman year she's tutored local high school and elementary students in Maryland. She hopes melding a social science with journalism will help her to be a community resource. When Tania is off from school she can be found visiting her family in New Jersey.

By participation and observation Tania learned the ins-and-outs of producing a national talk radio show. Because of the practical producing experience she gained she feels equipped to face the big, wild world of media. She had the opportunity to work extensively on one show in particular, which dealt with minority student achievement. Other than NPR, Tania also has local television experience at UMTV based in College Park, Maryland.

back to top
Marley Magaziner
Marley Magaziner, All Songs Considered

Marley Magaziner commutes daily from her home in Cockeysville, MD, to NPR via the MARC train. It's about 2 hours each way, door to door. She spends the time listening to music and reading David Copperfield or working on the Sunday New York Times crossword puzzle.

Marley graduated from Smith College in 2004 with double major in comparative literature and french studies. She spent her junior year studying abroad in Paris where she lived on the same street as Roman Polanksi, had daily "learning experiences," ate fabulous food and did things only 21-year-olds in Paris do. Meanwhile she tried to keep up with her host family's rapid french and perfect her Parisian accent.

Marley has been involved in journalism since her junior year of high school and worked as an editor on her high school and college newspapers. After her first year at Smith, she interned in the underwriting department of WYPR, Baltimore's NPR member station. She then launched her career on the airwaves as a DJ at WOZQ in Northampton.

Marley was the intern for All Songs Considered, NPR's online music show. Besides opening all the mail and keeping duplicate copies of promotional or rejected CDs, Marley ran Open Mic, a portion of All Songs Considered devoted to helping undsigned artists gain some exposure. She picked the music for the show, contacted the artists for quotes, created sound files, scanned CD covers, made the "collage" of images, and got the site online each week. Other than that, she helped update the artist archives on the main All Songs Considered page, checked facts and pronunciations and requested CDs.

For her most recent project Marley contacted songwriters for The Perfect Song episode: You can hear Marley's idea of a perfect song under Staff Picks.

Marley's Piece: Marley's story on Intern Edition focuses on her visit to the College Music Journal's Music Marathon in New York and the state of independent music. Listen

back to top

Christa Marshall, NPR Online

Christa Marshall is a longtime NPR fan who changed careers to pursue journalism. As an online intern, she has been busy this fall working on web pages for Fresh Air, Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!, and the weekly "Replay" web feature. Christa ended up at NPR after a knee injury forced her to withdraw from the graduate school of journalism at Columbia University. She made the best of a bad patella and relished getting Pulitzer Prize winners to sing for her Intern Edition radio piece on the Gridiron Club. Christa plans to go to Columbia after she gets back to her usual life of hiking and dancing the tango.

Christa's Piece: A secret society of Washington journalists performs only for sitting presidents and, now, for you. Listen.

back to top
Julie Masis
Julie Masis, Weekend All Things Considered/Audience and Corporate Research

Julie Masis spent the first ten years of her life in St. Petersburg, Russia (which was then known as Leningrad, USSR). After that, she lived in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, not far from Boston. Julie graduated from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, where she studied international development (developing countries) and economics. Her hobbies are belly dancing, photography, travel, foreign languages, and writing. She doesn't really have a radio/journalism background, but has always been a public radio fan, whether it's NPR or CBC. She likes to listen to it while she cooks and does the dishes. Julie has always been very interested in the news, especially in relation to international coverage that pertains to the developing world.

Julie interned with two different departments at NPR: Audience and Corporate Research and Weekend All Things Considered. At Audience and Corporate Research, she mostly examined the NPR Online audience (the people who visit npr.org) and how they compare to the general online population: what products they buy, where they buy them, what cars they drive, what newspapers they read, etc. At Weekend All Things Considered she did various tasks including putting together a CD of some of the best cooking stories NPR has done, transcribing tape, suggesting story ideas, cutting two-ways, watching TV, and taking notes.

Julie's Piece: Julie's story for Intern Edition is about the Belarus Democracy Act. Listen

back to top

Leah Morse, Performance Today

Leah Morse hails from Honolulu, Hawaii. One day, she thought to herself, "Who wants to live in a tropical paradise?" And with that, she promptly got on a plane and spent the next four years of her life at Wellesley College. She graduated in May 2004. Fully enjoying herself in the estrogen-thick environment, Leah had many wonderful experiences. She majored in Cinema and Media Studies, an inter-disciplinary major, and minored in music. Among other highlights: participating as a violinist and cellist in a variety of music ensembles, taking advantage of the "anyone can participate, and we can't kick anyone off the team" policy to do crew, working in the campus co-op and museum, taking part in a 24-hour marathon to read aloud all of Shakespeare's work, and being one half of a stand-up comedy team. Here at NPR, Leah is the intern at Performance Today. When she first began, she was like a newborn infant. Blindly crawling around in the dark, she could hardly grasp all the radio lingo being rapidly thrown about the room, she didn't have the faintest idea how a radio show came together, and who did what. Now, she is a teenager. Her cubicle is one big cluttered mess and she dresses like every day is "casual Friday," but more importantly, she generally has a much better conception of how radio works.

The people of Planet Performance Today, floating around the 4th floor in a space ship shaped like a treble clef, are a gentle people -- they share a love of communal chocolate, are prone to the occasional sarcastic joking that happens at the editorial table, but, of course, what they are most known for, is their incredible knowledge of anything musical. On one occasion, someone's cell phone rang, and everyone at the table got very excited, and tried to come up with which Bach Fugue the ring was. As a result, Leah has learned much about music too, especially 20th Century music she would normally shy away from, and for that, she is very grateful.

Leah has also become the official PT library's treasure hunter, wandering through the depths of CD shelves finding CDs long thought to be lost, is a regular attendee of all the staff meetings, occasionally helps out other people in the Music Unit with various tasks, and has even been able to help out with picking music and writing!

back to top
Tina Patronas
Tina Patronas, Public and Media Relations

Constantina (Tina) Patronas graduated from McDaniel College in 2004 and majored in communications with a focus on cross-cultural studies. She did her senior thesis on "The McDonald's Corporation; Its Impact on Contemporary Societies" where she examined the McDonald Franchise in various under-resourced regions and studied the impact it had on different cultures. Both of her parents emigrated from a small village in Greece where she has spent each summer for the last 22 years, growing up, studying Greek, and building family/friend relationships. Tina is actively interested in a career in international public relations and living abroad. Tina grew up in Bethesda, MD, with her awesome twin sister (still in school) and two incredible older sisters who, she must add, are amazing role models, one being a doctor and the other an FBI counter-terrorist analyst. In her free time she loves swimming (not competitively), reading, knitting, going to the movies, and studying languages.

Tina interned in NPR's Public and Media Relations Division where the main goal is to help and protect NPR's image in the media. She spent a lot of her time researching reporters, drafting press releases, and assisting with outreach to various publications with an interest in covering NPR programming.

back to top

Clare Robbins, Day to Day

Clare Robbins is the intern for Day to Day at NPR West in Los Angeles. She recently graduated from Mount Holyoke College where she studied critical social thought and Spanish, and produced and hosted a political talk show about media called "The Fresh Media Getdown." When she isn't at NPR West, she volunteers with an affordable housing cooperative, teaches ESL, waitresses and practices yoga. Other passions include Latin America, media policy, and dance. Clare is a third-generation Los Angelena, and everday more in love with her city.

The intern for Day to Day has the opportunity to participate in the production of a fast-paced newsmagazine. The internship includes everyday tasks such as compiling and editing the DACS alongside an editor, running copy to the studio, ordering electronic press kits, booking, and logging and dubbing tape. The intern supports reporters and editors with research for their work and occasionally accompanies producers and reporters on assignments in the field where she is invited to offer ideas for the development of those stories. Day to Day staff encourages the intern to consider herself a team player, and independently research and pitch her own story ideas.

Clare's piece: Intern Edition's Clare Robbins reports on a celebration popular in some Mexican immigrant communities. For some partygoers, the sonido tradition has taken on new meaning since it's migration north of the border. Listen

back to top

Kathryn Schoendorf, Development

Kathryn Schoendorf graduated from Wesleyan University in Connecticut in May with a degree in philosophy. She learned to love inquisition while writing her honors thesis "The Philosophical Implications of Taking Anti-Depressants." While she had no background in journalism per se, NPR seemed like an exciting and stimulating place to take her curiosity. Currently, she works for the development department and is primarily interested in understanding what it takes to keep a worthy organization financially sustainable. Being from Northern California and a recently retired competitive swimmer she loves all things aquatic.

A funny intern experience: While greeting people for a corporate event hosted here at NPR she asked Robert Siegel, who she didn't recognize by face, if he knew where to go to take a tour. Not only is he a great host, but he is incredibly gracious in embarrassing situations.

back to top
Elise Thatcher
Elise Thatcher, All Things Considered

Elise has lived in the Pacific Northwest. She went to school at Whitman College in Walla Walla, WA, where she majored in politics and worked at renegade college station KWCW. While there, she was lucky to be introduced to the news biz one fateful summer at KBOO in Portland, OR. After graduating, she moved to Flagstaff, AZ, where she worked on an Americorps conservation crew and volunteered with member station KNAU. She is held captive by the desert mountains of the Southwest and hopes to return with a reporter's kit and solar powered battery recharger; there, she hopes to reinterpret the desert experience through radio journalism as not "deserted," but instead full of life. In the meantime, she loves to be outside, or inside and with a radio or sound editing program at her fingertips. She plans on staying in Washington, D.C., until delicious conservation or radio work draws her elsewhere -- hopefully the desert mountains of central Asia.

Elise interned with All Things Considered, which has been a radically rewarding riotous romp with radio enthusiasts of audio honor. No seriously... the fall was an incredible experience. The ATC staff, and NPR folks in general, are approachable and willing to share a trick or two of the trade. With a toolbox of radically improved skills, she plans on continuing in radio journalism, sound production specifically (a.k.a. "cutting"), whether it be at 635 Mass. Ave. or a member station.

Elise's piece: Elise's piece is a slice of the world of Drag Kings in Washington, D.C. Yes, that's "drag," and "kings," and the people on stage are women, not men. Are they transgendered? Are they trading in womanhood for masculinity? Listen

back to top
Lisa Venbrux
Lisa Venbrux, Arts and Information Desk
Host, Intern Edition Fall '04

Lisa Nuch Venbrux entered the working world dancing in a Hershey's Chocolate Syrup costume, and began honing her vocal skills as a tour guide at the infamous Indian Echo Caverns in Hummelstown, PA. After a year as a news writer and anchor on WERS 88.9 FM in Boston, she pursued a degree in individualized study at New York University. Her lifelong interest in Africa brought her to Tanzania to teach English, and to receive safari field guide training in South Africa's Kruger National Park. She is pursuing a career in journalism to spite her science-and-math-minded family.

As the Arts and Information Desk intern, Lisa attends sold-out concerts, exclusive art shows, and exciting movie premieres, all from the convenient location of her work computer. She also savors the glamor of sorting mail, the fabulousness of faxing, and the divinity of dubbing audio. Her solid Internet research skills and harebrained ideas have endeared her to the Arts Desk staff, despite her refusal to wear the Syrup costume again.

Lisa's Piece: Pagans in the Military. Listen



back to top
Odette Yousef
Odette Yousef, National Desk
Executive Producer, Intern Edition Fall '04

Odette Yousef hails proudly from the Home of the World Series Champions and center of the civilized world, Boston, MA. In June 2004 she graduated with a joint degree in economics and East Asian studies from Harvard University. Having had no journalism experience prior to her internship, she has greatly enjoyed learning from NPR reporters and editors while here, and working with her fellow interns to put together the Fall 2004 Intern Edition.

She interned with NPR's National Desk. While not occupied with NPR-related work, she has spent time familiarizing herself with the various entertainment and recreational opportunities in this wonderful city.

Odette's Piece: Odette did a story on a new smoking cessation campaign called "Maryquits." The campaign is waged primarily online, and combines reality TV with the traditional anti-smoking message. She wanted to find out just who Mary is, and how much she is helping other smokers quit. Listen



back to top

Interested in interning at NPR?





home | show | people | news | interning


    Next Generation Radio Project

2004 Intern Edition