Intern Edition Spring 2005

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What is Intern Edition?

Intern Edition is a unique radio program managed, produced, and promoted entirely by NPR interns with guidance and assistance from NPR staff members. Working in teams, NPR interns select, research, report, and edit stories; execute legal correspondence; publicize the show; and design the Intern Edition Web site. Created and presented by NPR's interns, the program presents a fresh and compelling mix of news, features, and commentaries about subjects interns find important. A rare learning experience in how to put together a newsmagazine, Intern Edition is streamed on NPR's Web site.

  to Intern Edition Summer 2005.              Listen to past Intern Edition programs

The hosts of Intern Edition Summer 2005

Ashlei Taylor, Music Director

"When I first wake up in the morning, people say my voice sounds low and sultry, good for radio."

Ben Cohen, Site Creator

"In the ninth grade I performed a radio drama of the Bhagavad-Gita. My history teacher said I sounded professional."

Intern Edition Summer 2005

Avoiding the Herd: Students Pursuing Business Careers May Have to Forge their Own Path

For parents who are concerned about their son or daughter's liberal arts degree, several colleges are offering a solution: pair more academic majors with business training. But major corporations say they’re not always looking for a business degree. Christian Nwachukwu Jr. asks what it takes to prepare young entrepreneurs.

By Christian Nwachukwu
Produced by Markell Williams

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Profile: Downtown Building Boom Raises Questions About Affordable Housing

Downtown Los Angeles is undergoing a makeover. Developers are revamping historic art deco buildings so they'll glisten again and attract big spenders. But whether conditions will improve in neighboring Skid Row is far from certain. NPR West reporter Jeremy Freed talks to residents who wonder if they’re about to be replaced.

By Jeremy Freed
Produced by Desmond Ortega

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Woodman's of Essex Withstands Another Red Tide

Back East on the Essex River in Massachusetts, Red Tide hit hard this year. Ashley Ahearn speaks to a family of multigenerational clammers who own a restaurant famous for its fried clams. They say that while profits have sunk, Red Tide may be just what the Essex River needed.

By Ashley Ahearn
Produced by Kella Hammond

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Cash for Conscience: Selling No Sweat

Sweat-Shop Free: 'Sweat-shop free' is the hip new mantra attracting everyone from punk rockers to baby boomers. But can it survive the global economy? Desiree P. Jones looks at how two new companies are moving beyond the bottom line.

By Desiree Jones
Produced by Michael Karavolos

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The Dark Side of the Music

How do we know when we hear evil in music? Is it the crashing dissonance, the screeching soprano? Claire Blaustein studies the musical elements in several scores of music that have long inspired a sense of horror in listeners.

By Claire Blaustein
Produced by Patricia Li
Audio Engineer Vahan Baladouni

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Irena

During the Holocaust, a Polish woman named Irena Sendler rescued 2500 Jewish children from the Warsaw ghetto. The story was relatively unknown until she was discovered in 1999 by a group of high school students from Uniontown, Kansas. Intern Edition’s Liliya Karimova has the story.

By Liliya Karimova
Produced by Michelle Siegel

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Unorthodox Sports Medicine: A new look at DMSO

College athletes are experimenting with an unlikely remedy for soreness called DMSO. It’s not FDA approved - but that’s not the only reason it’s turning heads. Katie Unger talks to scientists about the history of this drug.

By Katie Unger
Produced by Tracy Tran

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Under the Crush of Daily Life

How to balance idealism with professional ambition is a question that preoccupies many young people in the U.S. today. Under pressure to make a difference, many wonder how to incorporate activism into everyday life. A recent college graduate, Jill Merselis finds herself grappling with the burden of privilege and the yearning for change.

By Jill Merselis
Produced by Whitney Gent

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Keeping a Traditional Family Recipe Alive

A young Egyptian-American attempts the recipes that evoke vivid dreams and powerful memories. But can she pull off such a heady task? Listen as Yasmine Noujaim tries her hand at an ancient culinary art.

By Yasmine Noujaim
Produced by Marissa Harris

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Cinema Verite in Documentaries

A new genre of film is emerging in the wake of the documentary. “Murderball” is the most recent example of the hybrid film. Lisa Joy examines the blurry line that separates fact from fiction in this new form.

By Lisa Joy
Produced by Lily Percy

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The Smithsonian Folklife Festival Oman Program

This is the first year that the festival has featured an Arab nation - the Sultanate of Oman. The cultural presentations at the festival not only allow visitors the chance to experience another way of life, but also strives to dispel some of the media myths that are so common in this tense environ ment.

By Claire Blaustein
Producer Laine Middaugh
Audio Engineer Vahan Baladouni

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Mapping National Geographic's "Genographic Project"

A young woman with an uncertain heritage takes a test to determine her ethnic roots on air, and reflects upon the implications of her findings.

By Marissa Harris
Produced by Jehan Mondal

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Summer 2005 Intern Edition
Site Creators: Andrew Synowiez, Ben Cohen