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Are Blacks Really Leaving Baseball?Adya Beasley, Reporter; Annie Sugar, Producer
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Just 60 years after Jackie Robinson took the field at Dodger Stadium, black players are disappearing from Major League Baseball. Some experts say African-Americans’ lack of interest in the sport is to blame, yet inner-city little leagues are full of black youths.
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New Party Seeks to Hold Online Primary Mike Winters, Reporter; Whitney Winn, Producer
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Unity '08 wants voters to choose its presidential candidates in the first-ever online primary. The party hopes its use of the Web will include more citizens in the election process than ever before. But mobilizing via Internet has presents challenges as well advantages.
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Commentary: Should We Elect Our Voters? Andrew Clearfield, Reporter; William Haynes, Producer
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Reporter Andrew Clearfield has a plan to save democracy. Instead of allowing everyone to cast uninformed votes, he suggests we delegate our voting responsibilities to well-informed members of society. Call it ’Political Jury Duty’.
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Bringing ‘Chic’ to D.C. Becky Martinez, Reporter; To-Wen Tseng, Producer
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Washington, DC is a world-class city when it comes to politics, architecture and tourism, but compared to high-style American cities like New York and Los Angeles, Washington’s fashion scene is as bland as a brown suit. Now, movers and shakers in the DC government are mobilizing to see if they can kick DC’s fashion retail up a notch – or two – policy-style.
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Students Outline Challenges for DC Public Schools D’Anthony White, Reporter and Producer
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Six students at the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Boys and Girls Club in Southeast opened up about their experiences in high schools throughout the District. The students say, Chancellor Michelle Rhee, 37, must make students feel valued by putting an emphasis on quality teachers.
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Deer-tainees in DC: Caught, Moved and Released. Steve Mendoza, Reporter & Producer
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The deer population in DC is growing and there isn’t anything you can do about it. Wildlife specialist Ken Ferebee searches for a way to lower the number of automobile accidents and human-deer incidents in the district.
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Chocolatier Tops Creations with Gold and Silver Kayla Webley, Reporter; Sandhya Subramanian, Producer
Gold and Silver Chocolate
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D.C. chocolatier Jane Morris is looking to distinguish her confections by topping her handmade truffles with unique ingredients: 24 karat gold and sterling silver. She says it makes her treats more luxurious and it is completely safe to eat, but food scientists aren't sure ingesting metal is a good idea.
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Seeking African Roots through DNA Testing Kenya Young, Reporter & Producer
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More African-Americans are using genealogy testing to discover their ancestral roots. On an individual level, those having the tests done say they gain a new sense of pride that is life-changing.
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Postcard: Farm Fresh in LA Haley Bridger, Reporter; Ellie Atkins, Producer
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Santa Monica’s Saturday farmers market offers up fresh, organic produce as well as a wealth of delicious sights and sounds. This audio postcard invites listeners to experience the market through its sounds and voices.
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Did You Tip Your Tattoo Artist? Jes Abeita, Reporter; Pat Frank, Producer
Tipping Your Tattoo Artist
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Most Americans know tipping is expected for hairdressers, food servers and other service personnel, but there’s one facet of the service industry that many people overlook on their tipping tables.
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“Storm Over New Orleans”: Painting as Premonition Nicole Runningen, Reporter & Producer
Storm Over New Orleans
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Does the subconscious play a role in visual creation? New Orleans artist, Pat Trivigno, began a painting, “Storm Over New Orleans,” before Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005. Find out more about this eerie painting, its subconscious tie with the artist’s theory of “inner form,” and what fuels the continual drive for emotional expression.
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Mixed Martial Arts: A Fast-growing, Dangerous Sport Bill Putnam, Reporter & Producer
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Bill Putnam looks into the reasons why people risk serious injury to play this perilous sport.
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Video Games Bring Fresh Faces to the Symphony Hall. Benjamin Frisch, Reporter; Pat Frank, Producer
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When you think of the symphony, you don’t usually think of video games--but that may be changing. Video Games Live is a massively successful worldwide touring symphony stage show. These sold out shows perform music exclusively from video games, and they’re attracting a whole new crowd to the concert hall.
Hear this story as it aired on Weekend Edition Sunday.
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On Coney Island, Maritime Costumes and Mounting Concern Marina Giovannelli, Reporter & Producer
Save Coney Island
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Every summer, the kooky underbelly of New York City converges on a marching masquerade down Mermaid Avenue on Coney Island. This year marks the Mermaid Parade’s 25th Anniversary. But amid mounting plans for development in the area, rumors are abuzz about the future of the neighborhood – and the artsy, colorful parade.
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Disney’s Crew of Sailors Sets Sail in Open Ocean Race across the Pacific Ellie Atkins, Reporter; Haley Bridger, Producer
Farm Fresh in LA
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Young sailors, all under the age of 23, will sail on the Disney sponsored boat Morning Light for this year’s Transpacific Yacht Race. The crew, hand-selected to create a team of both amateurs and experts, will race against the pros this summer. Their journey and training experience will be caught on film for a feature-length documentary, to be released in 2008.
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Commentary: The Silence of Science Shannon Fowler, Reporter; Steve Mendoza, Producer
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Shannon Fowler is one of 18 young scientists who left their labs and field sites this summer to spend ten weeks working in the media. They have often wondered why people don’t care about issues like global warming or declining fish stocks and are learning about the challenge of translating scientific jargon and making research accessible to the public.
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Getting “Used“ to Modern Bookselling Allison Chang, Reporter; Katherine Vera; Producer
Local bookstores
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It’s old news that used and rare bookstores are often forced to close in the face of competition from large chain stores, but these days, the competition has entered a new arena: the Internet. With D.C. rent higher than ever, many local used bookstores have decided the choice is to get on the boat--or sink.
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SPF: Sunscreen Pill Found? Holley Simmons, Reporter & Producer
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A pill that claims to block out harmful UV rays has recently been made available in the United States. Studies show the ‘SPF’ pill does provide some additional protection when used in combination with sunscreen, but there are a few things to consider before popping these pills.
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Exploring Beyond Your Cultural BoundariesTamika Smith, Reporter & Nicole Runningen, Producer
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What type of music do you think comes from Northern Virginia…Pipes…yeah but how about drums? Northern Virginia was one the regions chosen for The Folk Festival in 2007. The curators took on the challenge of showing how new immigration has made an impact on Virginia’s culture.
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Future Librarians Face Dwindling Job Market Elza Gousseva, Reporter; Lauren Sin Producer
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In the future you may not see many professional librarians in publicly-funded libraries. Instead, computerized information systems and paraprofessionals will provide services for library patrons. Listen to what librarians, who attended the 2007 American Libraries Association conference think.
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A Career Telling Government SecretsJamie Rosen, Reporter; Marina Giovannelli, Producer
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The U.S. government keeps a lot of secrets, from the designs for nuclear bombs and the names of our spies to millions of other, less obvious things. Just last year, the government made more than 20 million decisions to classify information. Intern Edition's Jamie Rosen spent some time with Steven Aftergood, who thinks the U.S. keeps far too many secrets.
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