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For immediate release
July 25, 2003
Contact:
NPR: Laura Gross
202-513-2304
lgross@npr.org

Slate: Kris Coratti, 202-298-7600 x206

Day to Day, A New Radio Program From NPR, Debuts Nationally on July 28



LOS ANGELES - Day to Day, NPR's new radio newsmagazine, will debut on more than 50 public radio stations on Monday, July 28, 2003. From San Francisco and New York to Flagstaff and Boise, the program can be heard in five of the ten largest U.S. markets. Day to Day, produced in collaboration with Slate Magazine, will delve into newsworthy topics with a smart, savvy and spontaneous approach, featuring contributors from both NPR News and Slate. Award-winning NPR correspondent Alex Chadwick will host Day to Day from NPR West in Los Angeles.

Funded in part by a $1.8 million grant from the CPB (Corporation for Public Broadcasting), Day to Day is NPR's first new newsmagazine in a generation. Conceived by the creators of the leading morning and afternoon radio newsmagazines, Morning Edition and All Things Considered, the show's format and style answers the needs of busy listeners, with NPR news, commentaries and features in shorter segments, and more stories in the hour.

Day to Day will combine the unparalleled excellence of NPR News with Slate's award-winning journalism, offering new ways to examine issues, explain events and comprehend the world. Listeners will hear timely reports and features from NPR News, including regular contributions from writer and NPR correspondent Karen Grigsby Bates, former On The Media producer-at-large Mike Pesca, personal finance columnist Michelle Singletary of The Washington Post who will appear Tuesdays, former Daily Show correspondent Brian Unger, and Weekly Standard senior editor Christopher Caldwell. Slate writers and editors will contribute to the program, including Founding Editor Michael Kinsley, Editor-in-Chief Jacob Weisberg, Chief Political Correspondent William Saletan, Mickey Kaus, who writes "Kausfiles," Margo Howard, who writes the "Dear Prudence" column, and Emily Yoffe, a.k.a. The Human Guinea Pig.

"Day to Day has a very strong start-more than 50 stations are already signed up for the debut broadcast," said Jay Kernis, NPR's senior vice president for programming. "There's loud anticipation in the public radio system for a program that showcases the talents of Alex Chadwick. He's setting out to give hungry listeners something invigorating, fact-filled and a bit quirky to listen to in the middle of their daily routine. This positive showing is also a tremendous indicator of the combined appeal of NPR and Slate."

Day to Day is the second daily program in the span of a year to originate from the new NPR West studios in Culver City, Calif., near Los Angeles. NPR West is also the home of The Tavis Smiley Show from NPR, a weekday news and opinion program. Day to Day will complement a variety of daytime programming on public radio stations, from local interest programs to national shows from NPR such as Fresh Air with Terry Gross and Talk of the Nation.

Day to Day's latest broadcast, as well as archived programs and a list of stations broadcasting the show, will be available on the show's Web site at www.npr.org/programs/day.

With the addition of Day to Day, NPR produces and distributes more than 290 hours of programming a week, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, the second and third most listened-to programs in all radio. NPR's cumulative weekly audience has grown from 13 million listeners in 1998 to 21 million in 2002 - a gain of 56 percent in five years.


NPR, renowned for journalistic excellence and standard-setting news, information and cultural programming, serves a growing audience of nearly 20 million Americans each week via more than 680 public radio stations. NPR Online at www.npr.org brings hourly newscasts, news features, commentaries and live events to Internet users through original online reports, audio streaming and other multimedia elements. NPR also distributes programming to listeners in Europe, Asia, Australia and Africa via NPR Worldwide, to military installations overseas via American Forces Network and throughout Japan via cable.