For immediate release
September 8, 2006
Contact:
Emily Lenzner, NPR
  

NPR TO MARK THE FIVE YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF 9/11 WITH SPECIAL PROGRAMMING ACROSS ALL NEWS PROGRAMS

NPR AND WNYC® NEW YORK PUBLIC RADIO® COLLABORATE TO PRODUCE PROFILES OF PEOPLE WHO CHANGED THEIR LIVES IN RESPONSE TO THE TERRORIST ATTACKS

NPR.org to Complement News Coverage with Interactive Features, Photos


Washington, D.C.; September 8, 2006 – NPR News will mark the five year anniversary of the September 11 attacks with in depth coverage beginning today on Morning Edition and through Monday’s anniversary on NPR News programming. The centerpiece of the coverage, produced in collaboration with WNYC® New York Public Radio®, an NPR Member Station, will be a series of profiles of people from around the country who chose to radically change their lives since the terrorist attacks.

The profiles include a young New Jersey woman who joined the National Guard and moved to Illinois, a Pakistani businessman who turned his Brooklyn storefront into a community center and a business executive who left his job to start a foundation in honor of his son. These will be featured on the NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition, Day to Day and All Things Considered, Weekend Edition Sunday and All Things Considered Weekend.

In addition, the NPR daily talk show Talk of the Nation will focus its September 11 edition on how the attacks have affected military men and women; caller participants will include military personnel and their families. The daily news information program News & Notes will hear from a Professor of Exposure Science on the environmental impact of the Trade Center disaster, lessons learned and what is still needed to be better prepared for another public health crisis.

The profiles airing are:

Today on Morning Edition: WNYC’s Cindy Rodriguez profiles a Pakistani businessman who chose to convert his Brooklyn storefront into a community center for his neighbors and, over the last five years, has evolved into a non-profit center hosting legal clinics, English classes, and youth programs.

All Things Considered Weekend, Saturday, September 9: Rosalie Gattuso’s job at a dental office on Long Island required her to locate dental records for patients lost in the attacks; she chose to change careers and become an emergency medical technician. NPR’s Allison Keyes reports.

All Things Considered Weekend, Sunday, September 10: Fran Maher was general counsel for United Airlines on 9/11; following the tragedy, she left her corporate job to assume the job of CEO of the American Red Cross of Greater Chicago, focusing on building the organization's capacity to survive another unthinkable disaster. NPR’s Cheryl Corley reports.

Weekend Edition Sunday, September 10: After the attacks, Manhattan resident Patricia Berger turned to atheism and is now a charter member of the New York City Atheists. NPR’s Margot Adler reports.

Day to Day, Monday September 11: Liesl Marelli was a student at Montclair State University in New Jersey when the country was attacked; instead, she joined the National Guard and moved to Springfield, Illinois, a community she believes is more military friendly for her new career choice. David Schaper reports.

All Things Considered, Monday September 11: WNYC’s Beth Fertig profiles New York firefighter Steve Marsar, who worked at the World Trade Center on the day of the attacks. Promoted since then within the chain of command, he attributes his ability to cope with the events of that day to his training.

Other profiles will include Anne Hawke’s profile of Herb Ouida, a former executive vice president of the World Trade Centers Association, who left his job to start a foundation in memory of his son, Todd, a currency trader at Cantor Fitzgerald; Tovia Smith’s profile of Paul and Liz Coolleen, a Manhattan family who relocated to Maine to escape the dangers of a metropolitan area, only to face a new family tragedy that for them put their 9/11 experience into perspective; and Libby Lewis’ profile of Mark Dubowitz, a Canadian venture capitalist who is now helping run a foundation in Washington, DC that seeks to promote moderate Muslim thinkers.

www.NPR.org will complement the broadcast coverage with extensive visual tools and graphics, including an audio slideshow of those profiled and archived audio form NPR’s coverage of September 11, 2001 and the following days.

Additionally, NPR is offering NPR Member stations around the country the opportunity to broadcast the audio version of Ted Koppel’s live town meeting hosted by the Discovery Channel. Koppel’s special, focusing on the state of national security and civil liberties in America, will air Sunday evening, September 10. Public radio stations will air the program in several ways. Some will broadcast it live on September 10 from 9:30-11PM (ET). Preceding the town meeting, NPR will set the stage with a 30-minute radio program from 9-9:30PM (ET) examining the evening’s topic, hosted by Talk of the Nation’s Neal Conan and featuring an interview with Koppel. Others are airing a one-hour version of the town meeting during the week of September 11.

NPR was recognized for its extensive coverage of the 9/11 attacks and their aftermath with an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award, The Overseas Press Club 2001 Lowell Thomas Award, a George Foster Peabody Award, and a National Association of Hispanic Journalists Radio Award.