January 22, 2007
Contact:
Emily Lenzner, NPR
 | 

NEW POLL FROM NPR NEWS AND PEW RESEARCH CENTER
LOOKS AT POLITICAL POLARIZATION AND COLLABORATION
IN AMERICA

PEW’S ANDREW KOHUT DISCUSSES POLL RESULTS
TODAY ON ALL THINGS CONSIDERED

RESULTS AND ANALYSIS AVAILABLE AT WWW.NPR.ORG


Washington DC; January 22, 2007 – According to a new poll conducted in association with NPR News by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, a large majority of Americans thinks the country is more politically polarized than ever before and values those who seek to bridge the gap with compromise. Commissioned to study the public’s views of political polarization and collaboration, the survey results and analysis are featured today on NPR as part of a week-long series, Crossing the Divide, airing across all NPR News platforms and which explores American views of bipartisanship and leadership today. Andrew Kohut, Director of the Pew Research Center, discusses the results of the poll on NPR’s newsmagazine All Things Considered this evening (check www.NPR.org/stations for local listings).

Survey results and analysis are available on www.NPR.org at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6943953#6940728

Poll results are based on telephone interviews conducted from January 10-15, 2007 and among a nationwide sample of 1,708 adults, 18 years of age or older.

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