February 21, 2007
Contact:
Anna Christopher, NPR
 | 

THE FLAMING LIPS FRONTMAN WAYNE COYNE
OFFERS PERSONAL ESSAY ON HAPPINESS
FOR NPR’S THIS I BELIEVE
ON NPR NEWS MORNING EDITION
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 26




February 21, 2007; Washington, D.C. – Wayne Coyne, eccentric singer and guitarist of the Grammy Award-winning rock band The Flaming Lips, discusses the value of creating one’s own happiness in an essay for the NPR series This I Believe, airing on NPR News Morning Edition, Monday, February 26. Inspired by newsman Edward R. Murrow’s 1950’s radio program of the same name, This I Believe features Americans from all walks of life expressing their core beliefs and values in short, personal essays.

Before making it big with The Flaming Lips, Coyne worked as a fry cook at Long John Silvers for 11 years. In his essay for NPR’s This I Believe, he says that his fast food job “allowed me to dream about what my life could become.” His experiences also taught him to “try to be happy within the context of the life we are living. Happiness is not a situation to be longed for or a convergence of lucky happenstance. Through the power of our own minds, we can help ourselves.”

In addition to fronting The Flaming Lips, Coyne wrote, directed and starred in the unreleased science-fiction film Christmas on Mars. He lives in his hometown of Oklahoma City with his wife, Michelle, a photographer.

Coyne joins an impressive list of well-known essayists who have contributed to the series since its premiere on April 4, 2005, including former Secretary of State Colin Powell; Senator John McCain; Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates; skateboarding icon Tony Hawk; activist Gloria Steinem; author John Updike; psychologist Kay Redfield Jamison; and scientist Brian Greene.

More than 18,000 NPR listeners have also submitted essays to This I Believe. Essays chosen for broadcast have ranged from revelations about parents, personal struggles, race and identity to the importance of feeding monkeys.

This I Believe essay writing has been incorporated into the activities of schools, community groups, places of worship as well as birthday celebrations. Essays have also been read or played at weddings and funerals. The series is a collaboration between NPR and This I Believe, Inc., Dan Gediman and Jay Allison, producers.

Visit www.NPR.org for stations and times of NPR News Morning Edition. To date, This I Believe essays have ranked among the top e-mailed stories on NPR.org. To listen or to read past essays, please visit www.NPR.org/thisibelieve.