August 13, 2007
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Anna Christopher, NPR
   

FORMER IRAQI PRIME MINISTER DR. AYAD ALLAWI
SAYS IRAQ NEEDS NEW NONSECTARIAN GOVERNMENT
ON NPR NEWS ALL THINGS CONSIDERED
TODAY, MONDAY, AUGUST 13

EXCERPT BELOW; AUDIO TO BE AVAILABLE AT WWW.NPR.ORG



August 13, 2007; Washington, D.C. – In an interview airing today on NPR News All Things Considered, former Iraqi Prime Minister Dr. Ayad Allawi tells host Robert Siegel that Iraq is in a “chaotic situation,” and the government under Prime Minister Nouri-al Malaki is part of the problem: “I think the system ought to be reexamined. I think, unfortunately, Malaki is part of a sectarian system which is influencing and affecting the country negatively. And we cannot see recovery – political recovery that is to say – if this sectarian system remains operational in the country.”

When asked about Malaki’s ability to reach political compromise, Dr. Allawi says: “Well, in fact, the whole situation is based on sectarianism and is anti-reconciliation. And that’s why he is part of the system. I think the whole system ought to be changed, and a nonsectarian regime should prevail.”

When asked about the current state of Iraq, Dr. Allawi says: “Unfortunately there are things yet to come. The country is on a slipping road towards more and more chaos and violence. And we cannot see the end of the tunnel – the light to bring Iraq out of this mess. Sectarianism still prevails. Terrorism is still rife in the country and infiltrating the country all the time. The army, the police are riddled with militias. And every day there are a hundred, almost just over a hundred people killed.”

All excerpts must be credited to NPR News All Things Considered. Television usage must include on-screen NPR News credit with NPR logo. The audio of the interview will be made available at www.NPR.org at approximately 7 PM (ET).

All Things Considered, NPR's signature afternoon news magazine, is hosted by Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel and reaches 11.5 million listeners weekly. To find local stations and broadcast times, visit www.NPR.org.