February 29, 2008
Contact:
Anna Christopher, NPR

   

NPR NEWS REPORTS:
IRAQI COURT SETS ASIDE CONVICTION FOR U.S. CITIZEN
STORY AIRING ON ALL THINGS CONSIDERED
TODAY, FEBRUARY 29

BUSH ADMINISTRATION MAINTAINS U.S. COURTS HAVE NO ROLE IN CASES
INVOLVING U.S. CITIZENS UNDER THE CONTROL OF MULTI-NATIONAL FORCES IN IRAQ


February 29, 2008; Washington, D.C. – NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg is reporting tonight that Mohammed Munaf, a U.S. citizen convicted in an Iraqi court for kidnapping and sentenced to death, has had his conviction set aside by an Iraqi appellate court for lack of evidence. She also reports that, next month, the Bush administration will argue before the Supreme Court that U.S. courts have no role in the cases of U.S. citizens under the control of the multi-national forces in Iraq. The story is airing tonight on NPR News All Things Considered. Complete audio is available here: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=87809198

Totenberg reports that Munaf’s lawyers notified the Supreme Court today that his conviction was set aside, because the basis for that conviction – a transcript of Munaf’s confession and written statements of witnesses against him – could not be found. Munaf was first detained by the U.S. military in Iraq in 2005, after he and a group of Romanian journalists Munaf worked for as a translator were kidnapped.

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