April 14, 2008
Contact:
Anna Christopher, NPR

   

DALAI LAMA ACKNOWLEDGES CRITICS’ RIGHT TO PROTEST,
LAMENTS LOSS OF TIBETAN CULTURE UNDER CHINESE RULE
ON NPR NEWS MORNING EDITION TODAY, APRIL 14

COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT BELOW; AUDIO AVAILABLE AT www.NPR.org



April 14, 2008; Washington, D.C. – In an interview with host Renée Montagne airing today on NPR News’ Morning Edition, exiled Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama acknowledges that many in Tibet are critical of him, including, at one time, his own brother.

He recalls his brother telling him, "'Oh my dear younger brother, sold out Tibetans right. In history, you will remain as a traitor.' And also even some Tibetans very critical about Buddhism. But I never say to these people, 'Shut up.' No, I cannot say. It is their right to express what they feel."

The Dalai Lama, who is visiting the United States to promote compassion amid heightened protest in his own country, also lamented the loss of Tibetan culture under the current political arrangement. "Since we have our own unique cultural heritage, including our language, our script, these matters should be in the hands of Tibet, who knows about our culture, about our religion,” he says. He continues: “With this present arrangement, whether intentionally or unintentionally, some kind of cultural genocide is taking place.”

A complete transcript of the NPR News interview is below. Full audio is available at www.NPR.org All excerpts must be credited to NPR News Morning Edition. Television usage must include on-screen NPR News credit with NPR logo.

Morning Edition, the two-hour newsmagazine airing weekdays and hosted by Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C. and Renée Montagne from NPR West in Culver City, Calif., is public radio’s most listened-to program with nearly 13 million weekly listeners. For stations and broadcast times, visit www.NPR.org/stations