May 13, 2008
Contact:
Anna Christopher, NPR

   

NPR NEWS MAY 13 UPDATE ON ITS SICHUAN EARTHQUAKE COVERAGE:


ROBERT SIEGEL, MELISSA BLOCK TRAVEL
TO HARDEST-HIT AREAS NORTHWEST OF CHENGDU



NPR AUDIO, NPR PHOTOS AVAILABLE;

NPR.ORG BLOG “CHENGDU DIARY”
BEING UPDATED REGULARLY


May 13, 2008; Washington, D.C. – Two hosts of NPR News’ All Things Considered, in Chengdu, China, for the show's first weeklong broadcast from a foreign country, are continuing to report from the scene of the magnitude 7.9 earthquake that struck Sichuan Province Monday. Robert Siegel and Melissa Block have been traveling throughout the region since the quake hit, reporting on destruction from remote villages in Sichuan and the capital city of Chengdu.

Today, Siegel traveled to one of the hardest hit areas, in a mountainous region northeast of Chengdu, to the small village of Gui Xi. Block visited the village of Ganxi near Beichuan County. Both hosts are providing extensive coverage on the developing story today on All Things Considered. Updates and previous reports are now available at www.NPR.org

In Gui Xi, Siegel speaks with grieving residents receiving medical treatment, some who walked as many as 20 miles to receive aid, and with medics on the scene. The leader of the village, Mr. Hsu, says of his family: “As far as I know, they are all buried.” Mr. Hsu describes his village’s basic needs: “[Through translator] We need badly – we need food, we need water, we need medical equipment, we need tents. That’s what we really need now.” He continues: “We believe in rebuilding this place again, we believe in our government, we believe in our party and our people and we will rebuild our home.” Siegel also reports that the village of Chuan Bei, farther up the road from Gui Xi, was wiped out completely when the mountains on either side of Chuan Bei collapsed onto the village, burying its population in a double avalanche. His complete report is airing on All Things Considered.

Audio, text and photos of all NPR News coverage from the earthquake in Sichuan are available at www.NPR.org All excerpts must be credited to NPR News. Television usage must include on-screen NPR News credit with NPR logo. To request an interview or permission to reuse audio, please see contact information is below.

Siegel, Block and NPR producers Andrea Hsu and Art Silverman are updating the NPR News blog “Chengdu Diary” with original text and images: http://www.npr.org/blogs/chengdu/ Joining them in China is NPR News Beijing correspondent Anthony Kuhn, who is monitoring the government's response as well as the situation in other parts of the country.

NPR’s All Things Considered is currently in Chengdu, where they were originally preparing for what was to be a week of reporting May 19-23. This marks the first time the NPR flagship afternoon newsmagazine program has reported from another country for an entire week. All Things Considered airs on more than 640 NPR Member stations nationwide. For stations and broadcast times, visit: www.NPR.org/stations

NPR News’ foreign coverage includes 18 international bureaus in such cities as Kabul, Dakar, Baghdad, Mexico City and New Delhi. NPR’s foreign coverage is consistently recognized for broadcast excellence, and has received every major award in journalism, including a 2007 Alfred I duPont-Columbia University Award and a 2005 George Foster Peabody Award for coverage of the Iraq War.

To request an interview with NPR’s hosts and reporters in China: between 7PM and MIDNIGHT (ET) contact Leah Yoon, 202.513.2306 or lyoon@npr.org; between MIGHNIGHT and 10AM (ET), contact Anna Christopher, 202.513.2304 or achristopher@npr.org Photos of the earthquake’s aftermath are available by emailing: lperloff@npr.org All credit must read: © 2008 NPR News, Andrea Hsu.