June 20, 2008
Contact:
Danielle Deabler, NPR
Andi Sporkin, NPR (for transcript on Saturday)

   

MEDIA ADVISORY

CONDOLEEZZA RICE TALKS WITH WEEKEND EDITION SATURDAY
HOST SCOTT SIMON ABOUT U.N. RESOLUTION
CLASSIFYING SEXUAL ASSAULT AS WAR CRIME;
PROGRAM AIRS TOMORROW, SATURDAY, JUNE 21


Secretary of State Also Speaks about U.N. Security Council,
Upcoming Zimbabwe Presidential Runoff Election


Excerpts Below; Audio to be Available Saturday, 1:00PM (ET) at www.NPR.org
Full Transcript to be Available Saturday, 9:30AM (ET)


June 20, 2008; Washington, D.C. – In an interview with host Scott Simon for NPR News Weekend Edition Saturday, U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice explains the reason behind the U.S.-sponsored U.N. Security Council Resolution 1325, adopted this week and saying sexual assaults against women in conflict zones may be war crimes, noting “I think we’ve had some experiences, even including some very bad experiences (with) peacekeeping forces.”

Secretary Rice also addresses the upcoming Zimbabwe presidential runoff election and what the U.S. is doing to get observers in the country and expresses some criticism of the U.N. Security Council’s responsiveness in certain situations.

All excerpts must be credited to “NPR News Weekend Edition Saturday.” Television usage must include on-screen NPR News credit with NPR logo. Audio of the interview will be available at www.NPR.org on Saturday, 1:00PM (ET). A full transcript will be released on Saturday at 9:30AM(ET).

Secretary Rice on the crisis with rape and sexual abuse against women in conflict zones:
“I think that we’ve had some experiences, even including for instance some very bad experiences (with U.N.) peacekeeping forces, and I have to say people have followed up and people have been punished…We’ve seen sexual violence against women in conflicts in the DROC, in Somalia and I think there was finally a sense that the UN security council which deals with threats to international peace and security had to consider this a threat to international peace and security.

On whether the Zimbabwe presidential election will be fair:
“…I think you have to say that when you have the president of Zimbabwe saying that he will never accept an outcome in which the other side wins, or when you have the so-called war veterans intimidating people and accusing opposition leaders of treason, it’s kind of hard to see how that can be a free and fair election. This is a very serious matter and the United States does intend to put it on the agenda of the Security Council next week.”

For local stations and broadcast times of Weekend Edition Saturday, visit www.NPR.org.