October 9, 2008
Contact:
Anna Christopher, NPR


   

GOVERNOR BILL RICHARDSON DESCRIBES STRAINED RELATIONSHIP WITH BILL CLINTON
ON NPR NEWS MORNING EDITION TODAY

RICHARDSON TO NPR: “I’VE RECONCILED WITH HER,
BUT WITH HIM, HE WANTS TO KEEP A GRUDGE,
THAT’S FINE WITH ME.”

EXCERPTS BELOW; AUDIO AT NPR.org



October 9, 2008; Washington, D.C. – In an interview with Renee Montagne airing today on NPR News’ Morning Edition, New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson describes a strained relationship with former President Bill Clinton, following his endorsement of Senator Barack Obama for president. Two excerpts from the interview are below; the entire interview is available now at: www.NPR.org

RENEE MONTAGNE: “What about you? Have you reconciled with the Clintons? Have you recently talked to Bill and Hillary Clinton?”

GOVERNOR BILL RICHARDSON: “Well, I had a fundraiser for Hillary Clinton about two months ago. And I’m very comfortable with what I did in endorsing Senator Obama. And we raised close to $250,000 for her debt. She appreciated it. We talked. Have I heard from President Clinton? No. It could be a pretty much a permanent fissure. But that’s politics, that’s OK. I did what I thought was best for the country. I’m still very fond of the Clintons. I’ve reconciled with her, but with him, he wants to keep a grudge, that’s fine with me. I move on. I’m Governor of New Mexico. I’m happy where I am.”

In the interview, Richardson also addresses whether Hispanic supporters of Senator Hillary Clinton will shift their support to Obama, and whether they have a level of discomfort with Obama’s race: "I think that's a myth that just gets perpetuated without any foundation. There's always voters that are going to have that problem. It's not just Hispanics, it's others. But a significant number of Hispanics, they like Obama because he's had to struggle. They like him because he's had an international background, because he started out as a community organizer and worked in neighborhoods and barrios. Sure, there's always with some voters some prejudices, but I see that movement from Clinton to Obama almost total in northern New Mexico. I almost see it happening. It's taken some time though. You know, there were some scars, some healing to do. But I'm seeing it happening."

All excerpts must be credited to NPR News Morning Edition. Television usage must include on-screen NPR News credit with NPR logo.

Morning Edition, the two-hour newsmagazine airing weekdays and hosted by Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C. and Renée Montagne from NPR West in Culver City, Calif., is public radio’s most listened-to program with nearly 13 million weekly listeners. For local stations and broadcast times, visit www.NPR.org/stations