November 19, 2008
Contact:
Anna Christopher, NPR


   

ALASKA SENATOR-ELECT MARK BEGICH DISCUSSES IMPACT
OF SENATOR TED STEVENS’ CONVICTION ON ELECTION
ON NPR NEWS’ MORNING EDITION TODAY

FULL TRANSCRIPT BELOW; AUDIO AT www.NPR.org



November 19, 2008; Washington, D.C. – In an interview airing today on NPR News’ Morning Edition, Alaska Senator-elect Mark Begich tells host Renee Montagne that incumbent Senator Ted Stevens’ felony convictions impacted voters’ decisions at the polls: “What we were facing was not just a case of, you know, was he going through a trial. But also, people really realized that even in a conviction situation, he would be facing the next year or two years of appeals and process through his caucus and many other things that would take away his focus from Alaska. I think that's what people were concerned about.” A complete transcript of the interview is pasted below; audio is available at www.NPR.org

Begich continues: “There was a lot of long-term history with Ted Stevens. You know 40 years he served our state and he did a lot of great service. But the last three or four years, I think, his focus was not really on what Alaskans needed. So I think the conviction played a role, but in an unusual way in the sense that people were concerned about where are we going to be as a state 30, 40 years from now and who can bring us down that path. And I think in the case of Ted Stevens, they were concerned that maybe he would not be able to do that because of his personal challenges that he had in front of him.”

In the interview, Begich also voices his support for oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refugee: “I've said that through the campaign that I think that's a reasonable approach based on the new technologies, the amount of footprint we would take up would be minimal. But I would put that into a long-term national energy policy. It would not be a project by itself. We have to look at the long-term energy requirements of our country and how we figure out how to get off foreign oil. That is the ultimate goal.”

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Morning Edition, the two-hour newsmagazine airing weekdays and hosted by Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C. and Renée Montagne from NPR West in Culver City, Calif., is public radio’s most listened-to program with more than 13 million weekly listeners. For local stations and broadcast times, visit www.NPR.org/stations

-NPR-


RENEE MONTAGNE: After four decades in the Senate, and a recent felony conviction on ethics charges, Alaska's Ted Stevens lost his seat on his 85th birthday, according to projections by NPR. As some of the final ballots were counted yesterday, two weeks after Election Day, Stevens was several thousand votes behind his Democratic challenger, Mark Begich, the mayor of Anchorage. This means the Democrats will have at least 58 seats when the new Senate convenes in January.

We reached Mayor Begich in Anchorage at his victory celebration. He stepped outside to talk to us, to escape the noise, right into Alaska's cold night air.

MARK BEGICH: It's about 7 degrees, and I'm actually out here without a jacket or suit because I thought I'd just do a short interview, but people are inside celebrating the campaign and so I stepped out to make sure I make this call.

MS. MONTAGNE: Well, we appreciate it, and you know, I think one of the first questions I think people have is, and certainly down in the lower 48 is, you have just overturned one of the longest political careers in the Senate's history. So much so that many of us know the name Ted Stevens. His name is on your airport there in Anchorage. How do you feel about having managed to defeat this person?

MR. BEGICH: Well, I think, you know when we started the campaign back in April of this year we focused on what options we would give the voters to make sure they have a choice, that they think about the future of Alaska. You know we're celebrating our 50th anniversary as a state this year, and people recognize the history of our great state. But they also see huge opportunities, and I believed I could offer an opportunity that would represent the Alaskans of the future.

MS. MONTAGNE: Now I do want to look ahead in this conversation to the future and what you would hope to be able to do. But before we move on to that, Senator Ted Stevens was convicted recently on seven felony charge. Alaska representative Don Young is under investigation by the FBI for corruption. How much were these corruption charges and Senator Stevens’ conviction, how much did that effect, do you think, the vote?

MR. BEGICH: Well, I think in an odd way, it was a mixture. For example, with Ted Stevens, what we were facing was not just a case of, you know, was he going through a trial, but also, people really realized that even in a conviction situation, he would be facing the next year or two years of appeals and process through his caucus and many other things that would take away his focus from Alaska. I think that's what people were concerned about.

MS. MONTAGNE: They weren't concerned about sending, as some have put it, a convicted felon back to the Senate?

MR. BEGICH: Well, I think that's part of it, but I think also, you know, there was a lot of long-term history with Ted Stevens. You know 40 years he served our state and he did a lot of great service. But the last three or four years, I think, his focus was not really on what Alaskans needed. So I think the conviction played a role, but in an unusual way in the sense that people were concerned about where are we going to be as a state 30, 40 years from now and who can bring us down that path. And I think in the case of Ted Stevens, they were concerned that maybe he would not be able to do that because of his personal challenges that he had in front of him.

MS. MONTAGNE: You know it's been suggested that President-elect Obama might be interested in a permanent ban on drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. What's your position on that?

MR. BEGICH: Well, I would totally disagree. And I think you know that for him to make that statement this early would be a mistake. I think that we should first take a look at what's the energy policy of this country. How are we going to become more independent, as a country, from foreign oil?

MS. MONTAGNE: So just briefly though to turn that around, you would be in favor of drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge?

MR. BEGICH: Absolutely. I've said that through the campaign that I think that's a reasonable approach based on the new technologies, the amount of footprint we would take up would be minimal. But I would put that into a long-term national energy policy. It would not be a project by itself. We have to look at the long-term energy requirements of our country and how we figure out how to get off foreign oil. That is the ultimate goal. Because we are dependent so much on foreign oil that we are really strapped in what we can do as a country. And we have to figure out new energy sources, as well as how do we reduce demand as a country, because that's a huge impact. That's why the oil prices have come from 140 down to 55 bucks a barrel is because we have reduced demand by almost five percent. That's what we need to be focused on and that in the long term for our country will be a great benefit.

MS. MONTAGNE: Well, I just have one final question and I know it's - did you just say 7 degrees there where you're standing -

MR. BEGICH: It's 7 degrees!

MS. MONTAGNE: I'm just going to hold you for one last question and that's -

MR. BEGICH: No, no problem. I appreciate it.

MS. MONTAGNE: One Alaskan has become a household name and that's Sarah Palin. You will be needing to work with her more closely, I would imagine, in these coming years. What is your relationship?

MR. BEGICH: It's actually a very good relationship. As mayor of Anchorage we have 43 percent of the state's population, and we have worked on a variety of projects, from road projects to renewable energy to a variety of things. So we have a good working relationship. Matter of fact, when she got nominated for vice president, I called her within a couple of hours and congratulated her, I wished her the best. But at the end of the day she is the governor of her state and I will continue to work with her as I have done as mayor.

MS. MONTAGNE: Mark Begich spoke to us late last night from Anchorage, where's he the mayor. And as of last night, he's Senator-elect Begich from Alaska. NPR called the election in his favor.