February 20, 2009
Contact:
Anna Christopher, NPR


   

AMBASSADOR SUSAN RICE TELLS NPR THERE IS “NO AMBIGUITY”
ABOUT IRAN’S PURSUIT OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS PROGRAM

RICE’S FIRST ONE-ON-ONE BROADCAST INTERVIEW
AS U.S. AMBASSADOR TO U.N.
AIRING ON ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, TODAY, FEBRUARY 20

TRANSCRIPT BELOW;
AUDIO AVAILABLE AT 7:00PM (ET) AT www.NPR.org



February 20, 2009; Washington, D.C. – In her first one-on-one broadcast interview as United States Ambassador to the United Nations, Susan Rice discusses Iran’s nuclear weapons program, telling NPR’s Michele Norris on All Things Considered: “The news today confirms what we all have feared and anticipated, which is that Iran has – remains in pursuit of its nuclear program. There’s no ambiguity about that, and our aim is to combine enhanced pressures, and indeed the potential for direct engagement to try to prevent Iran from taking its program to fruition.” The interview with Ambassador Rice is airing in two parts today and Monday, February 23 on NPR News’ All Things Considered.

On President Obama’s view of foreign policy, Rice says: “…American interests can best be advanced by working with others and seeking to build bridges and cooperative relationships. It’s not often, nor should it often be us against them. So we will extend our hand, we will look to others to do the same. But we won’t pick unnecessary battles, we won’t seek confrontation for confrontation’s sake. We want to set a very different tone and to signal to the world that America is back and that we want to lead in a way that can be trusted and respected.”

In part two of the interview, airing Monday, Rice talks about her diplomatic approach. When asked about her basketball game, and what it says about her diplomatic style, she says: “I’m not sure my talents haven’t been exaggerated in the press. …Oh, I can throw an elbow or two, if need be. And I used to have a little bit of game; I played in high school as a point guard on my high school team, I played in graduate school, again as a point guard.”

She continues: “I am a team player. And that is written into being an effective point guard: you’ve got to see the court, you’ve got to set up the play, and you’ve got to let others execute, for the most part. I don’t throw elbows for the sake of throwing elbows, but if somebody throws one at me, and it’s necessary to respond in kind, I suppose I can if I have to.”

A complete transcript is below. All excerpts must be credited to NPR News All Things Considered. Television usage must include on-screen credit with NPR logo. The audio of the interview will be made available at www.NPR.org at approximately 7:00 p.m. ET.

All Things Considered, NPR's signature afternoon newsmagazine, is hosted by Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel and reaches more than 11.5 million listeners weekly. To find local stations and broadcast times, visit www.NPR.org

-NPR-


NOTE: THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT, AND MAY CONTAIN MINOR ERRORS.

AMBASSADOR SUSAN RICE: People are excited again about the United States. They see us as fulfilling our promise and potential and again being a beacon of leadership and hope to the rest of the world. Now, the expectations are out of whack and exceedingly high, but the goodwill and the partnership really is there.

MICHELE NORRIS: So you begin your tenure with a reservoir of goodwill and, as you say, expectations, though, that are somewhat out of whack, very high expectations. What are the dangers there, when people are expecting so much, perhaps too much, from the United States?

AMB. RICE: Well, the danger is that the world forgets that the United States is the United States, and at the end of the day, like every other country, we have our own national interests and we will not be able to be everything to everybody, nor would it be wise for us to try. But what President Obama brings that I think is a different perspective and insight, is that so often, American interests can best be advanced by working with others and seeking to build bridges and cooperative relationships. It’s not often, nor should it often be, us against them. So we will extend our hand, we will look to others to do the same. But we won’t pick unnecessary battles, we won’t seek confrontation for confrontation’s sake. We want to set a very different tone and to signal to the world that America is back and that we want to lead in a way that can be trusted and respected.

MS. NORRIS: When you say America is back, I am imagining that there are members of the previous administration that wince when they hear you say that.

AMB. RICE: Well, I think the United States has gone through, by any objective measure, a period of time where many around the world have lost some degree of confidence in our intentions and our leadership. The question is, need that be a lasting and permanent change in perceptions of the United States or can, in fact, those perceptions change and can our leadership again find itself welcomed and embraced?

MS. NORRIS: I want to ask you about two developments in the news today. We now know that Benjamin Netanyahu has been asked to serve as the leader of the state of Israel. We have also learned in the news today that Iran has acquired enough nuclear material to make a nuclear bomb. Netanyahu has signaled that his primary focus will be on Iran and the development of nuclear weapons. How does that change or complicate U.S. policy toward Iran?

AMB. RICE: Let me begin with Israel. The United States has and will maintain a very strong relationship with and indeed alliance with Israel, and that’s the case irrespective of the leadership there and the leadership here in Washington.

MS. NORRIS: Even with a much more hard-line government?

AMB. RICE: That’s been the case before and it will remain the case. Our interests are, as the President said, are multiple. First of all, obviously, by the appointment of a special envoy, Senator Mitchell, the President and Senator Clinton have signaled their strong desire to pursue American efforts to support the Israelis and the Palestinians in coming to a settlement of the conflict that can result in a two-state solution with Israel and the Palestinians living side-by-side in peace and security. We’ll have to see how events unfold in Israel, should Mr. Netanyahu become prime minister, and it will be our point of view that this remains a very important element of our approach and our policy. But both sides, both parties have to want to work in that direction.

With respect to Iran, as the President has said on a number of occasions, the United States views Iran acquiring an illicit nuclear capacity as a grave threat to ourselves, to the region and indeed to Israel. We are in the process of an early and urgent review of U.S. policy towards Iran. The news today confirms what we all have feared and anticipated, which is that Iran has – remains in pursuit of its nuclear program. There’s no ambiguity about that, and our aim is to combine enhanced pressures, and indeed the potential for direct engagement to try to prevent Iran from taking its program to fruition.

(END)