August 18, 2010
Contact:
Anna Christopher, NPR


   

NPR NEWS NAMES THREE 2010-2011 JOAN B. KROC FELLOWS

Students from San Diego, Rapid City and Glen Mills, PA
Selected For Prestigious Journalism Training Fellowship

This fall, NPR welcomes three journalism scholars from Mills College, Hamline University and Swarthmore College, as the 2010-2011 Joan B. Kroc Fellows. Now in its sixth year, the Kroc Fellowship identifies and trains the next generation of public radio journalists, selecting three to participate in an intensive, year-long program at NPR and Member stations.

This year's Fellows were chosen from more than 250 applicants, coming from 150 colleges and universities in seven countries, 39 states and the District of Columbia. They are:

Sarah Gonzalez of San Diego, CA. Gonzalez is a graduate of Mills College in Oakland, and currently produces Morning Edition on KPBS in San Diego. While a reporting fellow with KALW in San Francisco, Gonzalez documented the root causes and community solutions to violence in Oakland. Her work has been honored with Edward R. Murrow and Gracie awards.

Serri Graslie of Rapid City, SD. Graslie is a graduate of Hamline University in St. Paul, where she studied anthropology and was editor-in-chief of the school's newspaper. She also played cello in the orchestra. Graslie interned with the website Whats Up Buenos Aires while living abroad and studying Spanish; in 2008, she was a presidential election tally stringer for the Associated Press.

Hansi Wang of Glen Mills, PA. As a student at Swarthmore College, he developed, reported and produced War News Radio, an entirely student-run program covering the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Wang also founded Chinatown Youth Radio Philadelphia, teaching radio to students out of a makeshift studio. He is a native Chinese speaker, and worked as a refugee housing coordinator in Philadelphia.

The Kroc Fellowship is made possible through a 2003 bequest from Joan B. Kroc, the philanthropist and widow of McDonald's Corporation founder Ray A. Kroc. Each Kroc Fellow works alongside NPR News reporters, producers and editors to gain experience reporting, producing and editing, as well as digital news and multimedia production. Additionally, the Fellows spend time at NPR Member stations to explore journalism at the local level.

Last year's Fellows made contributions throughout the organization. Their reporting included the story of a New Jersey town's link to the Underground Railroad; federal opportunities for entry-level job seekers; and profiles of a young soldier and DEA agent killed in Afghanistan.

Previous Kroc Fellows have gone on to full-time positions at NPR and in public radio. Bilal Qureshi, a 2007-08 Fellow, is currently a production assistant with NPR's afternoon newsmagazine All Things Considered. Melody Kramer, from the class of 2006-07, is the associate producer of digital media at Fresh Air in Philadelphia. Douglas Hopper, a 2005-06 Fellow, works as an editorial assistant for NPR's daily news and talk program Tell Me More.

More complete bios for the 2010-2011 Kroc Fellows are below. Information about the Kroc Fellowship and the application requirements for the 2010-2011 program are available at www.NPR.org/about/fellowships

The 2010-2011 Kroc Fellows:

Sarah Gonzalez is from San Diego, CA, and currently co-produces Morning Edition on her hometown NPR Member station, KPBS. She is a graduate of Mills College in Oakland, where she was a teaching assistant for Intermediate Public Radio reporting. Gonzalez received a Public Interest Reporting Fellowship with KALW News in San Francisco, and she was part of a team that documented the causes of, and community solutions to, violence in Oakland. Her work has been honored by the Society of Professional Journalists and the Public Radio News Directors Inc., and received Edward R. Murrow and Gracie awards. Gonzalez is also fluent in Spanish.

Serri Graslie comes from Rapid City, SD. She studied anthropology at Hamline University in St. Paul. She was editor-in-chief of Oracle, Hamlineís student newspaper, and played cello in the University Orchestra. At Oracle, Graslie managed 45 students, established the first code of ethics for the paper and developed a strong online presence. She interned with Whats Up Buenos Aries while living in Argentina and studying Spanish, and was also a reporter at the Rapid City Journal. In 2008, she was a presidential election tally stringer for the Associated Press. This spring, Graslie won awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Minnesota Newspaper Association.

Hansi Wang studied at Swarthmore College in his home state of Pennsylvania. While there, he developed, reported and produced War News Radio, an entirely student-run program covering the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He and his colleagues gained national distribution for the show, and had their work featured on PRIís The World and Third Coast Festivalís Re:sound on Chicago Public Radio. Wang also founded Chinatown Youth Radio Philadelphia. Working with a team of youth reporters, he created a makeshift studio, assembled professional journalists as trainers and taught the students about radio production. Wang worked as a refugee housing coordinator in Philadelphia. He is also a native Chinese speaker.