October 11, 2010
Contact:
Anna Christoher, NPR


   

TERROR MADE IN AMERICA: OCTOBER 11-14 ON NPR'S MORNING EDITION

DINA TEMPLE-RASTON EXAMINES HOW KEY OPERATIVES WITH TIES TO THE U.S. ARE USING WHAT THEY LEARNED IN AMERICA TO PLOT AGAINST IT

October 11, 2010; Washington, D.C. The upper ranks of international terrorist organizations have several key operatives with one thing in common: they are from America. In a four-part series airing this week on NPR's Morning Edition, counter-terrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston takes a close look at the extremist leaders who have clear ties to the U.S. whether as citizens or long-time residents and are now using intrinsically American ideals to plot against it.

"Terror Made in America" runs through Thursday, October 14 on Morning Edition. An extensive web component and a series overview are at NPR.org, where all pieces will be archived. For local stations and broadcast times, visit www.npr.org/stations

The single biggest change in terrorism over the past several years has been the wave of Americans joining the fight not just as foot soldiers, but as key operatives. In "Terror Made in America," Temple-Raston introduces listeners to a handful of this country's most successful jihadis people who have risen to a position of prominence in the world of radical Islam from places like Miramar, Fla.; Charlotte, N.C.; Brooklyn, N.Y.; and Albuquerque, N.M.

Going beyond their biographies, Temple-Raston expertly shows how these men have emerged as masterminds, propagandists, enablers and media strategists by bringing uniquely American qualities to the groups they support.

The series opens with Adnan Shukrijumah, one of Osama bin Laden's top lieutenants, who was born in Saudi Arabia, but grew up in Florida. His path to power reads like a typical American success story: he worked his way up. The second piece profiles Samir Khan, the North Carolina man who is thought to have used his media-savvy to create a new English-language magazine for al Qaeda's arm in Yemen.

Temple-Raston also interviews Yousef al-Khattab, a founder of the extremist Muslim group Revolution Muslim that operates openly in New York City. By embracing America's ideal of reinvention, the group has become a gateway for young Muslims looking to sign up for violent jihad. On Thursday, the series closes with Adam Gadahn and Anwar al-Awlaki, two Americans with who have helped al-Qaeda develop a savvy online presence that is attracting recruits from around the globe.

Visit the series at: www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130439513