April 2, 2012
Contact:
Anna Christopher, NPR


   

PUBLIC RADIO MUSIC MONTH SPOTLIGHTS INVALUABLE ROLE
OF PUBLIC MEDIA FOR MUSICIANS AND MUSIC FANS

INITIATIVE THROUGHOUT APRIL CELEBRATES THE IMPACT OF PUBLIC
STATIONS,WITH EVENTS FEATURING NORAH JONES, DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE,
RODRIGO Y GABRIELA, JOSHUA ROMAN AND MORE

It's invaluable: millions of hours of eclectic music from tastemakers; access and insights to the world's best artists; conversations with legends, and chances to discover emerging talent; troves of new music and multiple genres; a free front-row seat to an original live performance.

This is the sound of public radio music - and this April is the time to turn it up.

Throughout April, Public Radio Music Month celebrates the essential role that hundreds of public radio stations play in championing and preserving a diverse array of musicians and music styles for millions of listeners. Audiences look to public radio stations every day for interviews and performances, introductions to new artists and a trusted ear and knowledge about genres such as blues, jazz, classical, bluegrass and indie rock. In this nationwide initiative, local public radio stations, musicians and fans spotlight the importance of this work and how federal funding helps make it possible.

To learn more about Public Radio Music Month, visit publicradiomusicmonth.org and follow @pubradiomusic on Twitter. Throughout the month, artists and stations will be tweeting their support using the hashtag #PRMM.

"We benefited from radio play on many public stations around the country at a time when we received little or no love from commercial broadcasters," said Nate Query of the Decemberists, whose 2006 album, The Crane Wife was voted top CD of the year by NPR listeners. "This airplay was, and is, essential to the growth of our band and business. And we're hardly alone. Thousands of today's artists rely on the exposure generated by NPR and non-commercial radio stations."

Dozens of stations are presenting special Public Radio Music Month events and performances in their local communities throughout April. Most events will be streamed at the stations' web sites; info is available at publicradiomusicmonth.org. Spotlight events include:

  • - April 8: WGUC, Cincinnati Public Radio, Cincinnati, OH - Broadcast of performance by pianist Jonathan Biss as part of Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra concert.
  • - April 13: WFPK, Louisville Public Media, Louisville, KY - Interview with Chris Walla of Death Cab for Cutie.
  • - April 13: WBGO, Newark, NJ - In-studio performance of NYU's Wayne Shorter Jazz Ensemble as part of Student Broadcast Festival.
  • - April 19: WWNO, New Orleans, LA - Exclusive interview with local New Orleans funk/rock band Bonerama.
  • - April 20: WFUV, New York, NY - Live broadcast of Rodrigo y Gabriela from Radio City Music Hall.
  • - April 27: KING-FM, Seattle, WA - Live performance and interview with acclaimed cellist Joshua Roman as part of NW Focus Live.
  • - April 30: WDIY, Bethlehem, PA - Live in-studio interview & performance by jazz great David Liebman.
The importance of public radio music stations is more than anecdotal. A national snapshot reveals how these stations differ from the commercial landscape, and offer listeners and musicians diversity in sounds and opportunities:

  • - Nationally, more than 180 public radio stations are devoted to non-commercial music formats such as classical, jazz, blues and bluegrass, and another 480 more include them in their programming line ups.
  • - A recent study of public radio found that 1 out of every 3 hours of listening is to music.
  • - On the whole, local public radio stations air nearly 5 million hours of music per year, the majority of which is locally programmed.
  • - Nearly 90% of all classical radio stations are public radio stations. The number of public radio classical stations has almost tripled in the past 20 years.
NPR is a content producer, program distributor and membership organization made up of more than 900 locally-owned and independent Member stations located in communities across the country. Among its many roles, NPR represents Member stations on matters of public policy at the federal level and pursues policies designed to ensure the continued growth and vitality of the public radio system.