April 17, 2012
Contact:
Emerson Brown, NPR


   

NPR NEWS EXPLORES FINANCIAL PRESSURES OF MULTIGENERATIONAL
CAREGIVING IN 'FAMILY MATTERS: THE MONEY SQUEEZE'

EIGHT-PART SERIES AIRS TUESDAYS, APRIL 17-JUNE 5,
ON 'MORNING EDITION'

One roof, three generations, countless decisions. As Americans live longer, many adults are feeling the financial and emotional stress of caring for aging parents while also supporting their own children. In the series "Family Matters: The Money Squeeze," NPR's Morning Edition chronicles the lives of three families to explore the challenging financial realities of what some economists call the "sandwich generation." The eight-part series beginning today reveals the specific pressures each family feels, and also assesses the options available to those facing similar situations.

"Family Matters: The Money Squeeze" airs in eight parts on Tuesdays, April 17- June 5, on Morning Edition. For local stations and broadcast times, visit www.npr.org/stations All of the reports will also be available online at www.npr.org along with moving photo essays depicting the families' routines and additional reporting on the relevant financial issues. Listeners can also share stories at the NPR Facebook page, and submit photos for potential use by NPR via Twitter and Instagram using the hashtag #nprfamilymatters or at the NPR Radio Pictures Tumblr.

In the first few weeks of "Family Matters," NPR correspondent David Greene shares portraits of three different families working through the multitude of financial decisions surrounding elder-care, college-bound kids and post-employment retirement plans. Each family opened their homes to Greene and NPR for several weeks, giving listeners intimate access to life in a multigenerational household and the accompanying array of financial and emotional pressures. Among the people audiences meet: Natasha Shamone-Gilmore from Capitol Heights, MD, who brought her dementia-suffering father to live in her home and is also trying to help her adult son, who lives at home, figure out his career path; Yolanda Hunter, of Odenton, MD, who quit her job to become her grandmother's full-time caregiver; and two sisters-in-law in Harrisburg, PA, who share the responsibility of caring for Grandma, moving her every two weeks from one home to the other.

"Family Matters" also focuses on financial literacy: the common financial struggles for this generation, and solutions. The series plans to tackle such topics as paying for college education, navigating complex real estate matters, and planning retirement while spending on parents and kids. NPR will also explore if the government can afford to defray the costs of eldercare, and if most people should now just expect to care for two generations.

Morning Edition, the two-hour newsmagazine airing weekdays and hosted by Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne from NPR West in Culver City, Calif., is public radio's most listened-to program with 13 million weekly listeners. For local stations and broadcast times, visit www.NPR.org/stations