September 6, 2012
Contact:
Emerson Brown, NPR


   

NPR TEAMS WITH THE PARIS REVIEW FOR LATEST 'THREE-MINUTE FICTION' CONTEST; WINNING STORY TO BE PUBLISHED IN DECEMBER ISSUE

'ALL THINGS CONSIDERED' ACCEPTING ORIGINAL SHORT STORY SUBMISSIONS UNTIL THROUGH SEPTEMBER 23 AT NPR.ORG

NPR teams with The Paris Review to raise the stakes and bragging rights for the latest "Three-Minute Fiction" contest, launching this Saturday, September 8 on the weekend version of All Things Considered. The story that wins the NPR competition will be published in the quarterly that Time recently called "America's greatest literary magazine."

A regular feature of All Things Considered created by host Guy Raz, "Three-Minute Fiction," challenges listeners to write original works of fiction that can be read aloud in three minutes or less. Each iteration features a guest judge who provides a prompt that must be included in contestants’ stories. For the ninth round, bestselling suspense novelist Brad Meltzer acts as judge and will fittingly reveal his story starter on Saturday.

"At The Paris Review we're committed to finding new writers, new readers, and new ways to tell a story," says editor Lorin Stein. "That's why we love 'Three-Minute Fiction': so many of the contestants are non-professionals, and the winning entries are always ingenious and original. And fun to read. We'll be honored to publish the winner in our pages."

"Since we launched 'Three Minute Fiction' in 2009, more than 45,000 people have submitted stories," says Raz. "And what we’ve discovered is that across this country, there’s a deep wellspring of untapped talent just waiting to be discovered. We like to think of it as a bit like the American Idol of micro fiction."

As well as publishing the winner, the staff of The Paris Review will also help select finalists in the contest. Meltzer will choose the winning story in mid-November; NPR's Susan Stamberg will read the story on air and the winner will be interviewed by Raz. Entries will be accepted online at NPR.org where complete contest rules will also be available: www.npr.org/threeminutefiction

About The Paris Review:
Founded in 1953, The Paris Review is America's best-loved and most influential literary magazine, specializing in the discovery of new talent. Over the years, the Review has published early work by such writers as Jack Kerouac, Philip Roth, Mona Simpson, David Foster Wallace, Jeffrey Eugenides, and Elizabeth Gilbert.

About All Things Considered:
NPR's afternoon newsmagazine, All Things Considered is produced at in Washington, D.C., with reports from NPR bureaus throughout the U.S. and around the world. On weekends, Guy Raz hosts and Steve Lickteig is supervising senior producer of the show which reaches two million weekly listeners.