For immediate release
August 5, 1999

NPR REPORTS ON THE SEARCH FOR EVIDENCE OF WAR CRIMES IN KOSOVO Two-Part Series Begins Wednesday on
NPR's
All Things Considered®

WASHINGTON, DC - On August 11 and 12, NPR'sŪ evening newsmagazine All Things Considered® features an in-depth look at the work of war crimes investigators in Kosovo. The series coincides with the 50th anniversary of the Geneva Conventions on War Crimes. (Please check with local NPR stations for broadcast times.)

In May, an international tribunal at the Hague indicted Slobodan Milosevic and four other Serb leaders for crimes against humanity. To substantiate these charges, prosecutors and forensic scientists have gone to Kosovo to gather material evidence and eyewitness accounts of mass killings in the province. One of the massacres cited in the indictment occurred in the farming village of Krushe Vogel. To document the criminal investigation against Milosevic and his aides, NPR sent correspondent Christopher Joyce and producer Jeff Rogers to Krushe Vogel.

In the first of two stories on the investigation, Joyce records the removal of bodies from a mass grave outside the town, the careful work to determine the cause of death and the efforts to identify the dead. In the second report, Joyce meets with a survivor of the massacre. Chamil Sheehu, 67, tells how Serb forces separated the men, herded them together and shot them at close range. Sheehu lost sons, cousins and uncles in the massacre. According to the indictment, 103 men were killed in the village.

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