Treatments

Risks Of Popular Anxiety Drugs Often Overshadowed

MPBNBenzodiazepines like Xanax and Valium are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the U.S. Patients and addicts often mix them with prescription painkillers — sometimes to deadly effect.

Xanax and Valium, prescribed to treat anxiety, mood disorders and insomnia, can be deadly when mixed with other sedatives.

Your Health

Despite Worries, Boston Survivor Heads Back To The Start Line

WBURAt last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.

Carol Downing is still haunted by memories of last year's marathon. But she's excited about reuniting with other survivors.

Policy-ish

Details On Abortion Coverage Still Elusive In Some Health Plans

KHNBoth supporters and opponents of abortion want to know whether their insurance provider covers abortion. But in some states, consumers are still having a tough time figuring that out.

Abortion coverage was a key sticking point during the congressional debate on the new health law. Lawmakers eventually agreed to let states decide.

Your Health

What Makes Couples 'Hangry'? Check Their Blood Sugar

To see if low blood sugar sours even good relationships, scientists used an unusual tool: voodoo dolls representing spouses. As hunger levels rose, so did the number of pins.

Volunteers with lower levels of blood sugar stuck more pins in voodoo dolls of their spouses than people with higher levels.

Policy-ish

The 7.5 Million Insured Through Obamacare Are Only Part Of The Story

APRNMillions signed up for health insurance through state exchanges and HealthCare.gov. But another several million bypassed the exchanges and bought health coverage directly from insurers.

President Obama announced in early April that more than 7 million people had signed up for health insurance through the exchanges.

Your Health

Gene Linked To Alzheimer's Poses A Special Threat To Women

Scientists have figured out one reason women might be more vulnerable to Alzheimer's: A risk gene doubles women's chances of getting the disease but has minimal effect on men.

Women make up nearly two-thirds of the people in the U.S. diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.

Your Health

Why Babies Cry At Night

Maybe she's not just hungry. One scientist thinks the chubby bundles have a devious plan: Exhausting a mom delays the arrival of another brother or sister.

More than just hungry or wet?

Policy-ish

Patients Often Win If They Appeal A Denied Health Claim

KXJZObamacare set national rules for appealing a denied health claim — a process that used to vary by employer and state. Consumers should appeal more often, advocates say. Half the time, they'll win.

A 2011 GAO report that sampled data from a handful of states suggests that, even before Obamacare, patients got the claim denial overturned 39 to 59 percent of the time when they appealed directly to the insurer.

Your Health

Mind Over Milkshake: How Your Thoughts Fool Your Stomach

What we think about food may change how our bodies respond to it. Sip what you think is a rich milkshake, and your body acts as if you've had a fatty treat, even if it's really a lower-calorie drink.

milkshake screenshot

Your Health

My Journey From Homeless Drug Addict To Magna Cum Laude

"I went after my recovery like I did my drugs and found I was able to accomplish anything I truly wanted," says Daney Hill, who now works with addicted and imprisoned mothers.

Maria Fabrizio for NPR