The Fasting 5K: No Food, No Water, No Problem For Muslim Runners

It might sound crazy to run while fasting, but runners in five U.S. cities joined the Fasting 5K, held during Ramadan, to share their commitment to their faith.

Runners form a human bridge at the finish line to cheer fellow racers. Participants completed a 3-mile loop around the National Mall — without food or water since sunrise.

Americans Really Like Jews. Muslims And Atheists? Not So Much

A new Pew poll asked how warmly respondents felt toward people of varying religious groups. The answers varied with race, age and political leanings — and not all the feelings were mutual.

Rabbi Aaron Raskin plays the shofar as Jews mark Rosh Hashanah during a traditional Tashlich ceremony in September 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. A new Pew poll asked how warmly Americans felt toward people of varying religious groups.

Why An African-American Sports Pioneer Remains Obscure

The story of Alice Coachman Davis, who died last week, offers plentiful reminders about mid-century attitudes on race and gender. But ultimately, her story is about transcending all that.

Alice Coachman clears the bar at 5 feet to win the running high jump at the Women's National Track Meet in Grand Rapids, Mich., in 1948.

How Turbans Helped Some Blacks Go Incognito In The Jim Crow Era

At the time, ideas of race in America were quite literally black and white. But a few meters of cloth changed the way some people of color were treated.

South Asian scholar Chandra Dharma Sena Gooneratne wore a turban to avoid anti-black discrimination in the American South.

New York's 'Night Of Birmingham Horror' Sparked A Summer Of Riots

The shooting death of a black teenager by a white police officer in New York City led to six days of rioting in Harlem and Bedford-Stuyvesant — the first in a series of violent protests in 1964.

Helmeted New York City police carry away a rioter at West 130th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem on July 19, 1964.

Study Reveals Worse Outcomes For Black And Latino Defendants

Researchers who looked at two years of records from the Manhattan district attorney's office found that race was a significant factor in determining how prosecutors resolved cases.

Cyrus Vance Jr., the district attorney for Manhattan, wanted to see if there were disparities in how the cases were disposed of.

Viola Davis Gets Groundbreaking Role As ABC Bets On Diversity

This fall, ABC will offer its most ethnically diverse slate of new shows in recent memory. But getting people to talk freely about why that's happened is still difficult.

Actress Viola Davis speaks about her new ABC show How to Get Away with Murder at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour in Los Angeles.

The George Zimmerman Trial, One Year Later

The trial in the killing of Trayvon Martin became a flashpoint for conversations about race, class and gun laws. Here's what's happened to some of the most-discussed topics from the trial since.

George Zimmerman's trial became the locus of heated debate about racial profiling, gun laws and the criminal justice system.

Was The Green Turtle The First Asian-American Superhero?

A new graphic novel written by Gene Luen Yang re-imagines the Green Turtle, a mysterious superhero created during World War II, as the American-born son of Chinese immigrants.

The Shadow Hero, a new graphic novel by Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew, revives the comic book hero the Green Turtle.

Relics Of The Patron Saint Of Immigrants Take A Pilgrimage

This month, Saint Toribio Romo's relics will be displayed in churches around California. His spirit is said to guide, feed and shelter immigrants as they journey across the U.S.-Mexico border.

This month, relics of St. Toribio Romo will be on display at several Catholic churches in Southern California.