Officer Robert Yocum informs Beatle fans Chelie Mylott and Melody Yapscott, right, that they'll have to move from their spot in front of the Hollywood Bowl. The women had no tickets but hoped to get them from scalpers or sneak in. This photo was published in the Aug. 24, 1964 Los Angeles Times. John Malmin/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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The Beatles Live At The Hollywood Bowl

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The New York-based orchestra Alarm Will Sound puts a fresh twist on The Beatles' most maligned song. Carl Sander Socolow/Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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01Revolution 9

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    Song
    Revolution 9
    Album
    Alarm Will Sound presents Modernists
    Artist
    Alarm Will Sound
    Label
    Cantaloupe
    Released
    2016

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The Beatles in 1963 with their first silver record. (From left) Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, producer George Martin and John Lennon. Chris Ware/Getty Images hide caption

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Sir George Martin, The 'Fifth Beatle,' Dies At 90

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The music that makes one of us emotional doesn't always make sense to others. William Lovelace/Getty Images hide caption

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The Songs That Make Us Cry

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Clockwise from upper left: Bright Eyes, Ed Sheeran, Louis Armstrong, Etta James, Peter Gabriel Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Love Songs You Love To Love

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Singer-songwriter Yusuf (formerly known as Cat Stevens) Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Guest DJ: Yusuf/Cat Stevens

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Wayne Coyne of The Flaming Lips speaks to NPR's Arun Rath about his band's new album, With A Little Help From My Fwends. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Messing With Perfection: Why The Flaming Lips Took On 'Sgt. Pepper'

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