Ella Fitzgerald sings with bandleader Chick Webb in Asbury Park, N.J., in 1938. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Ella Fitzgerald's Early Years Collected In A Chick Webb Box Set
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In a conversation aired on WBGO, Jessye Norman credits the study of jazz with her understanding of song interpretation. Carol Friedman/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Frank Sinatra's "The Coffee Song" makes light of a perceived Brazilian coffee glut. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Jittery Jams: 10 Songs For Coffee Lovers
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Don Byron released Love, Peace, and Soul with his New Gospel Quintet on Feb. 21. Till Krautkraemer/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Gospel Meets Jazz, With Unpredictable Results
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Ella Fitzgerald: Putting all her Easter eggs in one basket. Photo Illustration: Lars Gotrich/Photos: William Gottlieb/Library of Congress via Flickr, iStock. hide caption

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Ella Fitzgerald performs with the Dizzy Gillespie Big Band in 1947. That's Gillespie to her right, in complete awe. William Gottlieb/Library of Congress via Flickr hide caption

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The Music Of 'Ella!' On JazzSet
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Ella Fitzgerald had not one sad edge to her voice. She always had listeners smiling by the second note. George Konig/Hulton Archive hide caption

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Ella Fitzgerald: America's First Lady Of Song
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Ella Fitzgerald: A Trove Of Club Treasures
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