Robert Plant and Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin are defendants in a copyright lawsuit that accuses their band of lifting music from the song "Taurus" by the Los Angeles band Spirit. Laurance Ratner/WireImage hide caption

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LISTEN: Opening riff, Led Zeppelin's 'Stairway To Heaven'
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John Paul Jones, Robert Plant and Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin. The band's "Stairway to Heaven" is the subject of a current copyright-infringement lawsuit. Danny Martindale/Getty Images hide caption

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Inspiration Or Appropriation? Behind Music Copyright Lawsuits
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Prince & The Revolution's Purple Rain. Amazon.co.uk hide caption

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All Songs Rewind: The Best Opening Tracks
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Jimmy Page is remastering and reissuing all of the Led Zeppelin albums, along with previously unreleased recordings. Ross Halfin/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jimmy Page Reflects On 40 Years Of Led Zeppelin's 'Physical Graffiti'
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Robert Plant's new album is lullaby and... The Ceaseless Roar. Ed Miles/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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The Re-Education Of Robert Plant
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Lisa Robinson interviews a young Michael Jackson at his family's house in Encino, Calif., in October 1972. Andrew Kent/Courtesy of Riverhead Books hide caption

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How A Music Writer Learned Trust Is The Ultimate Backstage Pass
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British rockers Led Zeppelin pose in front of their private plane, dubbed "The Starship," in 1973. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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On The Road To Rock Excess: Why The '60s Really Ended In 1973
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As the NPR Music team and others prepared to leave the network's old headquarters, mysterious messages began appearing on the windows and walls: "Everything will be better!" Mito Habe-Evans/NPR hide caption

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New Building, New Mix: Songs About Change
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The fictional band from This Is Spinal Tap plays a real-life concert in 1984. Nigel Tufnel, the guitarist played by Christopher Guest, favored amplifiers whose volume could be cranked up to 11. Ebet Roberts/Redferns hide caption

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These Go To 11: Songs Best Heard Extra-Loud
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