Duke Ellington composed "Afrique" as part of The Afro-Eurasian Eclipse, a suite informed by his numerous world tours. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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06Afrique (Take 3, Vocal)
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Duke Ellington rehearses for a 1973 concert in London's Westminster Abbey. Central Press/Getty Images hide caption

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Duke Ellington's compositions present a timeless contribution to American music's legacy. Victor Drees//Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Bartz performs at the 1973 Montreux Jazz Festival. The saxophonist is often cited as a messenger of black empowerment in music. David Redfern/Redferns hide caption

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T-Bone Burnett On 10 Years Of 'O Brother, Where Art Thou?'
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Duke Ellington signs his biography in London in 1958, with Billy Strayhorn in the background. Reg Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Listen Now: Jack Towers On Restoring His Award-Winning Duke Ellington Recording, In 1980
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