The Tallis Scholars sing the music of Estonian composer Arvo Pärt. Eric Richmond hide caption

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Deceptive Cadence

Songs We Love: The Tallis Scholars, 'Nunc Dimittis'

A British choral group, known for its incandescent sound, reveals bells and sunlight in the Estonian composer's Nunc dimittis.

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Estonian composer Arvo Pärt, creator of contemplative music, photographed in 1990 by influential patron Betty Freeman. Betty Freeman/ECM Records hide caption

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Estonian composer Arvo Pärt's music is celebrated at the Metropolitan Museum of Art with a performance of his choral work Kanon Pokajanen at the Temple of Dendur. Kristian Juul Pedersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The young pianist Inon Barnatan plays Debussy and Ravel with striking assurance. Avie Records hide caption

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Deceptive Cadence

Headbanging Bruckner And Debussy In Black And White

NPR Music's Tom Huizenga and host Guy Raz spin an eclectic mix of new classical releases.

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Conductor John Eliot Gardiner's Monteverdi Choir has been named the best choir in the world by Gramophone magazine. Courtesy of the Monteverdi Choir hide caption

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Dale Warland says the music of Durufle and Part transcends religious ties. iStock hide caption

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