13.7: Cosmos And Culture Commentary On Science And Society

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The sun rises behind the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation telescopes at the National Science Foundation'€™s South Pole Station. Steffen Richter/Harvard University hide caption

itoggle caption Steffen Richter/Harvard University

The Concorde was fast and changed how we thought about travel here on Earth. In the future, we may well travel at speeds that change our relationship with time itself. David Parker/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption David Parker/Getty Images

The Large Hadron Collider's ATLAS detector under construction in 2005. ATLAS is one of the tools physicists are using to try and understand how the universe works. Maximilien Brice/CERN hide caption

itoggle caption Maximilien Brice/CERN

The Dark Sector Lab (DSL), located 3/4 of a mile from the Geographic South Pole, houses the BICEP2 telescope (left) and the South Pole Telescope (right). Steffen Richter/Harvard University hide caption

itoggle caption Steffen Richter/Harvard University

Observing the multitude of galaxies in our own universe is a piece of cake. Observing the multiverse, if such a thing exists, seems impossible. Above, the Milky Way rises above the ESO's ALMA observatory in Chile. Y.Beletsky/ESO hide caption

itoggle caption Y.Beletsky/ESO