Dave Douglas: Tiny Desk Concert At NPR Music

Sometimes, when our favorite bands and musicians come to town, we at NPR Music like to invite them up to our office to play a little for us. Like, literally, our office. It's called a Tiny Desk Concert, and today, we welcomed trumpeter, composer and ABS guest-writer Dave Douglas and Brass Ecstasy to the 5th Floor of NPR Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

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UPDATE: Show's over folks. Thanks for tuning in, and sorry if you had any problems! Rest assured, it's all been captured on video. You'll see a higher-quality, neatly-produced video within a few weeks at the Tiny Desk Concerts archive, or it'll appear in your iTunes (or whichever program you use) if you subscribe to the Live Concerts From All Songs Considered podcast.
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Usually, we reserve this sort of thing for spare, quiet singer-songwriters, or other types of acts that wouldn't necessarily intrude into an office filled with busy journalists. But Brass Ecstasy is a — well, it's an ecstatic brass band. Along with Dave, there's Luis Bonilla on trombone, Vincent Chancey on French horn, Marcus Rojas on tuba and Nasheet Waits on drums. Take that, productivity!

Anyway, we're expecting some slightly-stripped down arrangements of tunes from the band's new album, Spirit Moves. We're hoping to hear a mix of pop covers — this group takes on Hank Williams, Rufus Wainwright and Otis Redding on the record — and a few of Dave's creatively-arranged originals. Brass band tradition; 21st Century ambition. Fun times all around.

We hope you can join us for NPR Music's first-ever jazz concert at the Tiny Desk. And if you miss it — it is in the middle of the workday, after all — we record these with an expensive microphone and cute little HD cameras (plural) and wrap it all into a video performance within a few weeks. So check back for the archive later, or subscribe to the Live Concerts From All Songs Considered podcast to get it delivered right to your hard drive.

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