The Decade And The Year In Jazz: The Tuesday Link Dump

Man, coming up with my own top 10 list in light of actual jazz critics' submissions is like bringing a snowball to a gun fight ...

The Decade In Jazz: Howard Reich argues that while jazz enjoyed a surge of visibility in the '90s that faded in years to come, "on purely creative terms, the '00s produced far more interesting work than the decade that preceded it." In recapping some of his work in the last decade, David Adler writes that his tastes have radicalized over the last 10 years too — perhaps reflecting the stunning diversity of 2000s jazz. Indeed, both writers make the point that the collapse of major record labels, at least where jazz is concerned, is one of the central narratives of the decade; it contributed to the ghettoization of jazz, but the indie labels (or even self-released recordings) that emerged produced an explosion of creativity.

The Best Jazz Of 2009 Summarized: The homie Lucas Gillan of Internet radio service AccuJazz has been keeping some statistics, tracking all the jazz top 10 lists of 2009 he could get his hands on. He's compiled them into a "critical consensus" top ten — and a radio channel to boot. The list, which I presume is more or less a preview of Francis Davis' Village Voice poll (2008, FYI), features Vijay Iyer's Historicity in that consensus #1 spot.

More 2009 Top Ten Lists: Here's Steve Greenlee in the Boston Globe. Andrew Gilbert in the Seattle Times. Mark Stryker in the Detroit Free Press. And Destination: Out's Fave Jazz Jamz.

Wynton Seeks The Spanish Jazz Purist: This story is too good to be true. Talk about bringing guns to snowball fights.

Wynton Marsalis, Football Commentator: I got an e-mail linking to this with the subject line "WTF, Wynton?"

Jazz Substandards: The McSweeney's piece that launched a Twitter meme. My favorite, because it reflects the actual experience of taking the MTA in 2009: "Take the 'A' Train and Then Transfer to the Shuttle and Then Take the '4' Train."

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