George Wein Talks New York Jazz Festival

George Wein i i

George Wein: "where Brooklyn at?" Matthew Peyton/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Matthew Peyton/Getty Images
George Wein

George Wein: "where Brooklyn at?"

Matthew Peyton/Getty Images

The official press release went out last week, but in a new JazzTimes posting, concert impresario George Wein unleashed some personal thoughts about bringing back a jazz festival to New York in June. (This after financial difficulties grounded the festival last year.) There'll be the usual slate of big-time shows in Carnegie Hall and blowout outdoor events. But Wein is also working with "young producers who [are] totally enmeshed with jazz" to present good shows in their respective clubs and venues, including multiple venues in Harlem and in Brooklyn. Tickets for most shows will top out at $15 — without a drink minimum — to make "concerts available to the young fan." And he also promises "one of the most exciting free jazz concerts New York will ever see" in Central Park. In other words, because he's relying on so many trustworthy people, the lineup is going to be sweet, and it's going to be affordable too.

Ever since he resumed full command of a remarkably diverse Newport Jazz Festival last year, I've been digging this new-look George Wein. For a slow-moving octogenarian and Upper East Sider who had been written off by many as a fuddy-duddy, it seems like he's really renewed his commitment to check out what's hot in New York today. He heard so much about the Brooklyn scene that he made an effort to see it for himself, and even wedged his way through suffocating crowds at Winter Jazz Fest to scope out the vibe. (I done saw it.) Anyway, all this is happening Jun. 17-26, 2010. In other news, an online journalist from NPR is looking for a sublet in New York for the second half of June. [JazzTimes: The Return of a Jazz Festival to NYC]

Related At NPR Music: 2009 Newport Jazz Festival full archive.

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