Photo: Alan Ferber

A Blog Supreme will be on vacation until after Labor Day. Until then, we are periodically leaving you with some photographs from The NPR Jazz Photography Pool, like the one below.

Alan Ferber i i

Alan Ferber. Reuben Radding/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Reuben Radding/Flickr
Alan Ferber

Photographer Reuben Radding writes:

Here, the brass band Asphalt Orchestra was playing their last performance of the week at Lincoln Center Out of Doors. They emerged from taxicabs on 65th Street and played in front of Alice Tully Hall, and then led us all over the grounds of the complex, eventually taking us to Damrosch Park, where this shot was taken. They were playing the Frank Zappa song "Zomby Woof," which Peter Hess arranged for the band. I had been shooting them from the start with a good Canon DSLR but I had only a small memory card and by the time they got to Damrosch I'd filled it. Fortunately I had another camera with me, a tiny Panasonic LX3, and its wide angle lens turned out to be exactly what I needed anyway, so I used that.
Alan Ferber started his solo blowing hard, bending his knees and leaning back. In my mind I saw this exact shot. I just needed him to bend a little more ... and more ... and then ... he did it! I snapped, and felt like I had directed him with my mind. Alan is an amazing player and musician but he's a quiet personality and I think there are a lot of people who don't see this side of him. You can see Jessica Schmitz, the piccolo player, in the background smiling at other people in the band in reaction. There were a lot of better photographers than me around that day, and with much better gear, but I was in the best place for this shot, and it felt at the time almost fated.

Here's the original, and a link to Reuben Radding's Flickr photostream. You may also know Reuben Radding as a bass player. And feel free to contribute your jazz shots to the NPR Jazz Flickr group.

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