Talking With The Jazz Educators

college graduate with guitar i i

It's not an ideal photo illustration, but you can imagine this guy specialized in jazz manouche or studied with Ralph Towner or something. iStockPhoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockPhoto
college graduate with guitar

It's not an ideal photo illustration, but you can imagine this guy specialized in jazz manouche or studied with Ralph Towner or something.

iStockPhoto

It seems to this observer that the widespread phenomenon of university-level jazz education is one of the defining (yet relatively hidden) characteristics of today's jazz community. So it's nice to see the that annual JazzTimes Jazz Education Guide is out, as a supplement to the latest issue. Lots of the articles have made it online, at the JazzTimes "education spotlight" hub.

The piece I've been most interested in didn't make the print issue, but it is online. It's a roundtable with the heads of several jazz performance programs, from the most talked-about (The New School, CalArts) to the less visible (Kansas State, SUNY-Purchase). The panelists all respond to some smart questions: How has the recession affected interest? What about the influx of overseas students? Is African American enrollment declining? How are you dealing with the rapidly changing music business? It's fascinating to see some consensus emerge on some issues, but other responses may frustrate your sense of what is actually going on at ground level — which is also fascinating. [JazzTimes: Current Trends in Jazz Education]

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