Around The Jazz Internet: Dec. 3, 2010

Or, Miles runs the YouTubes down (courtesy laugh anyone?):

  • Reedman Bennie Maupin and drummer Lenny White talk to The Revivalist about participating in Bitches Brew.
  • Willard Jenkins features some interesting and strong perspectives this week. Senegalese guitarist Pascal Bokar Thiam talks about his book From Timbuktu to the Mississippi Delta, and Aaron Goldberg is prompted on the need for young musicians to comprehend swing and the blues.
  • Have I ever linked the The New Republic music blog of David Hajdu? If I haven't, here it is. This is the fellow who wrote the biography of Billy Strayhorn, and writes frequently about jazz elsewhere.
  • Those who would like to see more, better Jazz Internet would be wise to check out helpjazz.com, while you still can.
  • The Jazz Video Guy sat down with Bob Cranshaw, Sonny Rollins' longtime bassist, about Sonny and about Lee Morgan.
  • A big feature on Kip Hanrahan, the man who ran American Clave records way back when, in Perfect Sound Forever.
  • Francis Davis on weirdo guitarists. (Weirdo = positive.)
  • This week in beyond-jazz issues which might be relevant to jazz: Alex Ross on "Why do we hate modern classical music?" Also, the Jazz Loft Project weighs in on "MFA vs. NYC."
  • Nextbop on the seeming surge of fan-funded jazz these days.
  • Jim Macnie reprints a 1990 interview with Muhal Richard Abrams.
  • Will Friedwald on Randy Weston.
  • Chris Albertson has lots of Christmas cards — from legendary jazz musicians.
  • Pianist Matthew Shipp on boxing and jazz.
  • A reggae interpretation of Kind Of Blue.
  • Destination: Out has some rare Roscoe Mitchell.
  • JazzWax has a variety of features, including a visit to Dave Brubeck's house.
  • The Jazz Session speaks with Rudresh Mahanthappa and Patrick Cornelius.
  • The Checkout this week features highlights from Barcelona, including features with Kurt Rosenwinkel, Paolo Angeli, Omar Sosa and Chucho Valdes.

Elsewhere at NPR Music:

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