Dizzy Gillespie: The 'All Things Considered' Interview, 1986

Dizzy Gillespie performs in New York, c. 1988. i i

Dizzy Gillespie performs in New York, c. 1988. Don Perdue/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Don Perdue/Getty Images
Dizzy Gillespie performs in New York, c. 1988.

Dizzy Gillespie performs in New York, c. 1988.

Don Perdue/Getty Images
"Jazz is supposed to be the most unselfish of art forms. In jazz, you give yourself completely to make somebody else play their best. You try to do something to make them, inspire them to do something. So it is a matter of sacrifice."
Dizzy Gillespie, on approaching music with respect

Imagine a time when jazz at the White House meant playing for Nancy Reagan. When folks like Branford Marsalis could be reasonably identified as "young guys, young musicians." And when many great bebop pioneers still inhabited this earth.

How about Feb. 5, 1986?

On that date, this blogger was ... barely sentient. But that's when NPR's All Things Considered aired Susan Stamberg's interview with jazz legend Dizzy Gillespie. Among other things, they talked about Gillespie's signature bent trumpet, playing for presidents and how jazz greats can learn from young musicians.

Have a listen — it's not too long — at the link above.


P.S. If you were wondering what else was on NPR in February of 1986, check out NPR's Playback podcast, which regularly culls the best of 25 years ago. This Dizzy Gillespie interview appears at the end of the latest episode.

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