Around The Jazz Internet: June 1, 2012

Is the Internet affecting the way we process live music? One writer thinks it's possible. i i
iStockPhoto
Is the Internet affecting the way we process live music? One writer thinks it's possible.
iStockPhoto

Other news from this past week:

  • Jerry Gonzalez and the Fort Apache Band, a cornerstone band for the New York Latin jazz community, are profiled briefly in the New York Daily News.
  • RIP Pete Cosey, guitarist with Miles Davis during his "electric" years, among tons of other work.
  • Incredibly funny stories from the Jim Cullum Jazz Band, a trad-jazz outfit. They're the folks on Riverwalk Jazz. Jim Cullum himself has a blog too.
  • Capitalbop, the D.C. DIY presenter/blog/show calendar/hub/main gig of a NPR Music contributor is profiled at the Washington Post.
  • Interview with Mazz Swift for About.com. She's a versatile violinist based in the New York area with a new string trio record.
  • "On the construction of Wynton Marsalis' Cultural Authority." It's about the rhetoric Wynton uses.
  • Muhal Richard Abrams, pianist and composer, was named a Living Legacy Awardee by the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation. This is not long after receiving an honorary doctorate from Columbia University.
  • Suspicious activity at a jazz club in Turkey.
  • A 1975 assessment of Charlie Parker. The first word is not reprintable.
  • RIP Don Wilson, Philadelphia cop — and jazz musician.
  • Jazz writer says the Internet is changing the way his brain processes live music. TL;DR.
  • On the golf supply store which hosts jazz shows.
  • Apparently, brass are Republicans and woodwinds are Democrats, says one political columnist. (I would think many jazz trumpeters would object to that.)
  • Destination: Out features a Jazz Composers Orchestra record helmed by trombonist Roswell Rudd.
  • The Jazz Session spoke with guitarist Miles Okazaki and vocalist Nicky Schrire.
  • The Checkout sat down with Henry Cole and had organist Jared Gold in the studio.

Elsewhere at NPR Music:

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.