Around The Jazz Internet: July 20, 2012

Eddie Palmieri was named a 2013 NEA Jazz Master this week. i i

Eddie Palmieri was named a 2013 NEA Jazz Master this week. Juan L. Cruz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption Juan L. Cruz/Courtesy of the artist
Eddie Palmieri was named a 2013 NEA Jazz Master this week.

Eddie Palmieri was named a 2013 NEA Jazz Master this week.

Juan L. Cruz/Courtesy of the artist

Sorry for the radio silence. More activity soon. Until then:

  • The 2013 NEA Jazz Masters were announced: Eddie Palmieri (pictured), Lou Donaldson, Mose Allison and Lorraine Gordon. All receive $25,000 and will be honored in a January 2013 ceremony. Four is the fewest number of awardees since 2004, but the program was slated to be cut in the first place last year, so ...
  • Chamber Music America (opens PDF) gave out well over $230,000 in grants to jazz ensembles this week, both for composition support and residency programs with local community centers. Recipients include saxophonists Rudresh Mahanthappa, Steve Lehman and Grace Kelly. For a dated (but perhaps still relevant?) discussion of CMA grants, here's a 2009 post.
  • Tarus Mateen is the subject of a Capitalbop profile. The bassist in Jason Moran's Bandwagon has had a rather incredible career, touring with Terence Blanchard while he was recording for OutKast and Goodie Mob.
  • Fred Hersch is interviewed by Ethan Iverson. The pianist really is one of the last of a generation who "learned in the old way, figuring it out by f—g up, getting back up on your feet, f—g up again, getting back up on your feet, hanging out, learning from people around you, listening to tons of records, learning the history of your instrument, learning the repertoire, the standard repertoire, the jazz repertoire, composing your own music, starting all that."
  • Orrin Evans is interviewed in the Village Voice. The pianist always speaks his mind and there's lots here on the economic forces shaping jazz. See also: Alternate Takes interview.
  • Melba Liston is the subject of a tribute performance from saxophonist Geof Bradfield. Though relatively forgotten these days by all except jazz historians, Liston was a trombonist and composer/arranger known for her extensive collaborations with Randy Weston. (See.) This was, by the way, supported by a CMA grant and studied at the imperiled Center for Black Music Research at Columbia College Chicago.
  • Dr. Lonnie Smith is profiled. A New York City 70th-birthday residency for the organist prompted the story. And no, he "won't discuss precisely what his turban signifies," though he "easily grows animated in conversation about nearly anything else."
  • Lionel Bastiste, as celebrated by New Orleans. See the slideshow too, and also photos/discussion about the unusual wake (you'll see).
  • Barry Harris is profiled ahead of a two-week residency at the Village Vanguard. The pianist talks a lot about his teaching activities — since the '70s, many in New York have known that to learn bebop, you go to him.
  • The Jazz Audiences Initiative gets put to the actual real-life test in Columbus, Ohio. The piece references a column by the great pianist Ramsey Lewis — here it is.
  • Life, Law and All That Jazz: Using the Art of Improvisation in the Courtroom." Sure.
  • JazzWax dug up 10 great jazz movie trailers.
  • The Jazz Session spoke with drummer Scott Clark and saxophonist Jerome Sabbagh.

Elsewhere at NPR Music:

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