Around The Jazz Internet: Sept. 7, 2012

Ornette Coleman, pictured here in 2006, was portrayed in a recently-restored 1986 documentary called Ornette: Made In America. i i

hide captionOrnette Coleman, pictured here in 2006, was portrayed in a recently-restored 1986 documentary called Ornette: Made In America.

Robert Atanasovski/AFP/Getty Images
Ornette Coleman, pictured here in 2006, was portrayed in a recently-restored 1986 documentary called Ornette: Made In America.

Ornette Coleman, pictured here in 2006, was portrayed in a recently-restored 1986 documentary called Ornette: Made In America.

Robert Atanasovski/AFP/Getty Images

Interviews, news and assorted information:

  • An old documentary of Ornette Coleman, c. 1986, has been restored. First link is to The New Yorker, this one to a New York Times review.
  • A freewheeling interview with Tim Berne in the Village Voice. The saxophonist and composer, happily profane and frank, reflects on his own label, being on a major label, the '70s lofts, the '80s "downtown" scene and pretty much everything else relating to his career in music.
  • Wynton Marsalis interview. I know, another Wynton interview, but this is notable that it 1) appears in Ebony, a black-interest magazine (you can see other jazz content on the right-hand side) and 2) adds some nuance to someone often thought of as against pop music (the bit about Robert Glasper especially).
  • Interview with Vijay Iyer about his latest collaboration with spoken word artist Mike Ladd. This is hip — it was done via instant message while watching the Democratic National Convention, and the project itself revolves around U.S. military veterans.
  • The first review that I've seen for the new book on Herbie Hancock's Mwandishi band of the late '60s and early '70s, and it comes from pianist George Colligan. A reminder here of the blog around the book.
  • Paul Desmond, the alto saxophonist best known for his time with Dave Brubeck, once had a "Canadian quartet" of his own. Here's some deep digging into that brief and little-recorded history.
  • Blues clubs in Chicago over time, since 1945. The maps here also plot out density of black populations by neighborhoods, which makes for some fascinating data.
  • A remembrance of Shimrit Shoshan from WBGO's Simon Rentner, who knew her well.
  • A fuller obituary for the late saxophonist Byard Lancaster.
  • Mariah Carey seems to have stopped by a famous cabaret room in New York to sing some standards the other night.
  • The Jazz Session spoke with organist Matthew Kaminski and the owner of The Gnu's Room in Auburn, Ala.

Elsewhere at NPR Music:

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