Viking's Choice

How Do You Make Your Year-End List?

It's that time of year again — when basement-dwelling mouthbreathers covered in vinyl dust (or at least glazed in a laptop glow) comb through their collections and start the arbitrary task of giving order to what happened in music in the past year. We love it. You love it. Every boy and girl with a blog/tumblr/twitter/whatever certainly loves it. This is list-making season.

List strips. i i

hide captionIt's list-making season. Some folks have some serious (read: obsessive) dedication to the craft.

Lars Gotrich/NPR
List strips.

It's list-making season. Some folks have some serious (read: obsessive) dedication to the craft.

Lars Gotrich/NPR

I've been making year-end lists since high school, but only in the past few years have I found the perfect way to satisfy my somewhat odd need to organize my music. I keep a running list all year in Google Docs, update it with favorite albums, songs, reissues and such. And around Dec. 1, I print out the document, cut the individual contenders into strips of paper — always in the same format: Artist- Album Title [Record Label] — lay them out on my desk at work, and occasionally reorder the strips until around 25 (again, an arbitrary number) remain. It all speaks to my very visual, still very stubbornly analog mindset, which you can follow on my Flickr album.

How do you assemble your year-end music list? A spreadsheet? An iTunes playlist? Scrawled on a post-it on the back of your Merriweather Post Pavilion LP? A leaderboard? Let us know in the comments, and if you have pictures, send us a link.

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