Roger Waters Revisits 'The Wall' For Final Anniversary Tour

Roger Waters

Roger Waters Courtesy the Artist hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy the Artist

Pink Floyd's monumental ninth album, The Wall, is celebrating its 30th birthday, and to mark the occasion, creator Roger Waters has decided to take the album on the road again. "Thirty years ago when I was kind of an angry and not very young lad, I found myself driven into defensive positions because I was scared of stuff," Waters tells the Associated Press. "I've come to realize that in that personal story, maybe somewhere hidden in there, exists an allegory for more general and universal themes, political and social themes. It's really for that reason that I decided that I'd try and create a new performance of this piece using a lot of the same things that we did all those years ago."

At this point, the new tour won't include any of the other original members of Pink Floyd. The full band (minus founding member Syd Barrett) last played together in 2005 in an incredibly rare performance for Live 8. Keyboardist Richard Wright has since died while guitarist David Gilmour and drummer Nick Mason have continued working on their own projects.

Waters' new Wall tour will start Sep. 15 in Toronto and end in Anaheim, Calif. Dec. 15. While the staging will updated to make use of advances in projection systems and other technology, Waters tells the AP the album's themes are still relative. "When we did it (30 years ago), we were after the end of the Vietnam War, and we're right now in the middle of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, so there's a very powerful anti-war message in The Wall. There was then and there still is now."

Waters also tells the AP that this will likely be his last major tour. "I'm not as young as I used to be. I'm not like B.B. King, or Muddy Waters. I'm not a great vocalist or a great instrumentalist or whatever, but I still have the fire in my belly, and I have something to say. I have a swan song in me and I think this will probably be it."

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.