Second Stage: Little-Known Bands You Should Hear

Second Stage:  Civil Civic

Listening to Civil Civic might be the best decision you make today. But don’t click play just yet. First, make sure to safely stow your acoustic guitar, along with your beard-rock records, and any other breakable items; You wouldn’t want anything to get damaged by the inevitable, frenetic limb-flailing that’s about to occur.

Civil Civic
Courtesy the Artist

With crispy guitar and crunchy bass as its driving force, Civil Civic is tight, purposeful, and not afraid to experiment with noise. It’s not that they’ve got a groundbreaking new sound, but I still hesitate to compare them to other electro-guitarist duos like Ratatat. Even though they share some sounds, the two bands are in essence very different.

Part of what separates Civil Civic is the duo's attitude — indifferent toward the more serious aspects of life, with an unabashed love for having a good time, which is an incredibly refreshing alternative to taking things too seriously. Judging by the band's website, the members are borderline social deviants, and rude, hilarious bloggers, to boot. Raucous but clever, these qualities come through in Civil Civic's music, as well. At this point, the two band members are spread between London and Barcelona, and it doesn’t look like they’ve made it to the States yet. For the time being, they seem content to tour as well as wreak general havoc around Europe, in what they call an abhorrently large “armored touring vehicle.”

Civil Civic put out its first EP on an awesome, limited set of 100 individually screen-printed, multi-colored cassette tapes. I’ve had “Less Unless,” the standout track from EP 1, on repeat for days now. This summer they’re putting out a “double b-side” 7-inch vinyl, entitled Run Overdrive/F—k Youth, which you can check out at the duo's website.

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