Late Night Dispatches And Photos From SXSW 2011: Thursday

Night time in Austin. i i

Night time in Austin. Shantel Mitchell/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Shantel Mitchell/Flickr
Night time in Austin.

Night time in Austin.

Shantel Mitchell/Flickr

A stunning day party at the Parish was just the beginning of day two at South By Southwest, so Bob Boilen, Robin Hilton, Ann Powers and Stephen Thompson met up late Thursday night to talk about what else they saw in Austin.

But the conversation — like the day itself — opens with the day party, and with a discussion of Colin Stetson, who made it sound as though five different instruments were coming from his one bass saxophone. Stetson used circular breathing and "vein-bursting power" to put on a hypnotizing performance. Then there was tUnE-yArDs, the moniker of Oakland-based musician Merrill Garbus, whose commanding vocals and deft looping made for a fabulous show. The Malian-born Khaira Arby brought a barrage of polyrhythm to the stage, and WILD FLAG offered a set that was equal parts catchy and noisy, taking the energy up a notch. Following WILD FLAG was The Joy Formidable, whose petite lead singer Ritzy Bryan felt larger than life on stage. Finally The Antlers offered a live sneak peek at their forthcoming album Burst Apart, a delicate mixture of grace and intensity.

After the showcase the gang hopped from show to show, seeing performances from Ham Sandwich, Agalloch, Visqueen's Rachel Flotard, Allen Stone, Yelawolf and more. You can listen to all of their thoughts on the best of SXSW day two at the top of the page.

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    Saxophonist Colin Stetson created vivid, enveloping, seemingly free-form soundscapes during his opening set at The Parish.
    Katie Hayes Luke for NPR
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    The NPR Music command center at The Parish, just before the webcast.
    Katie Hayes Luke for NPR
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    tUnE-yArDs' continent-spanning rhythms were fleshed out by a full band to disarming, often riveting effect at The Parish.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    tUnE-yArDs mastermind Merrill Garbus has a stunning instinct for harnessing limited resources to maximum effect.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    At the mic: (left to right) NPR's Ann Powers and Bob Boilen with Andy Uhler of KUT-Austin. On production in the back: Andy Carvin and Mike Katzif.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    The queen of Malian desert rock, Khaira Arby, presided over a small army of brilliant African musicians, who created a hypnotic backdrop for her gloriously swooping vocals at The Parish.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    Khaira Arby proved once again that so-called "world" music needn't be segregated from American rock and soul.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    True to its name, WILD FLAG put on a frenetic performance featuring powerful whirlwinds of guitar.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    WILD FLAG's set list for The Parish.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    Mary Timony's psychedelic tendacies were on full display at The Parish during WILD FLAG's concert. That guitar is only moments away from flying over the top of her head.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    No big deal, just walking down the street in fuzzy boots.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    Ritzy Bryan (center) was a spritely prescence during The Joy Formidable's fuzzy, mountainous set at The Parish.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    The Joy Formidable ended its brief four-song set in a wash of effects pedal-driven noise.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    Cheer up, kid! You're about to see The Antlers.
    Katie Hayes Luke for NPR
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    The Antlers performed its wrenchingly beautiful, as-yet-unreleased new album, Burst Apart, in its entirety at The Parish.
    Katie Hayes Luke for NPR
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    In front of the crowd at The Parish, The Antlers turned the layered Burst Apart into a sound that resonated deeply.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    Right off the stage and back on the mic: Peter Silberman of The Antlers gives a quick interview to NPR Music.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR
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    Nighttime over Austin.
    Shantel for Mitchell for NPR
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    A blur of activity by Emo's.
    Shantel Mitchell for NPR

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