BOBBY, 'It's Dead Outside'

Watching this video for "It's Dead Outside" makes me want to join a band. The seven friends featured here formed the trance-inducing group BOBBY at Bennington College in Vermont last year, and it's clear that they speak the same secret language — a spare and gauzy mix of ethereal folk and rock, rooted in spacious, radiant plumes of sonic bliss.

After graduating from Bennington, the members of BOBBY relocated to a house in the woods of Montague, Mass., to make music. That's where they shot the video for "It's Dead Outside," from the self-titled album they released this past June.

We asked BOBBY frontman Tom Greenberg to tell us a little bit about how the song and video came together.

"The song started with a skeleton/structure I already had written that morphed into a pretty, texturally based piece with the help of the other BOBBY members as part of a multi-media project for one of my classes at Bennington. BOBBY was not yet born, so the character of song sort of blossomed on its own, inspired much by some of the visual and olfactory projections that were going on during the rehearsals.

"I think this shoot touches on the contradictory feelings some of us were having towards the house we were living in Montague, Mass., at the time. Things were changing drastically for the band and some of the members were feeling pretty tired and emotional. This performance differs from the album version I'd say mostly in its slight sloppiness, improvisations, and lack of female vocal. That, in combination with the blur effect and movement of the camera, captures the complex, free spirit and fog we'd been existing in for the past year. Not to say that this footage lacks any sort of quality or expression on BOBBY's behalf, however. In fact, it's probably the most honest performance I've watched of our band since BOBBY started. That's my interpretation, anyway."

The members of BOBBY are working on a new video for "Sore Spores," also from their self-titled album. You can learn more about the video and how you can help make it happen at the band's Facebook page.

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