It's The Plants And Animals Variety Hour!

The title track of the new album by Plants and Animals, "The End of That" feels like a rambling session between two people who just can't stop talking. The song is full of emotional confessions ("I tried cocaine just to know what it could do/ I had to try it again just to give it a second chance") and slightly naive proclamations ("We're hoping to be friends and do cool stuff and be equal"). These vocal meanderings are all laid over a The Band-style jam session — the musical equivalent of the singer's babblings.

Be advised, this video contains profanity.

In an email, the band described their feeling behind "The End of That":

This is a late-night confessional, a catch up with an old friend over a beer. We went for the straight line in this song, musically and lyrically, as much as we ever have. It isn't an end so much as a road stop, really. Basic, naked, celebrating the journey.

A collaboration between the band and director/actor Joe Cobden, the video for "The End of That" evokes the cheesy early-'70s variety shows, particularlyThe Englebert Humperdinck Show. There's the requisite gross orange, blue and yellow color combinations and amazingly long sideburns. My favorite part is when an audience member appears out of nowhere and then quickly vanishes again. The video's lead singer is a little sleazier than the hosts of the day, however — he insinuates improper things to his back-up singers and sings lyrics that would not pass standards and practices.

Cobden says he worked with Plants and Animals to create the idea for "The End of That":

So often the music takes a back seat to the director's concept. I wanted to focus on the song, make it the star. Plants and Animals liked this ridiculous clip of Englebert Humperdinck, singing "Quando, Quando, Quando" on The Englebert Humperdinck Show. They suggested we shoot that kind of thing. Made sense to me and I was glad that they came up with it. ... I like to imagine a really tacky "Plants and Animals" TV show. It's absurd. And in the cacophony of self-promotion and music videos coming from everywhere, everyone with their band and record to push, it's important to have a good laugh at it all, not take it so seriously. Plants and Animals want to make good music for a living. They have to make videos to promote their records. They're not cheesy careerists, they're excellent musicians. So we wanted to tackle that in a fun way. Plus we figured we could do those amazing sets for, like, twenty bucks.

Plants and Animals' new album The End of That is out now on Secret City Records.

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