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Frank Ocean And Bon Iver Surprise Lucky NYC Fans

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    Frank Ocean performs at Angel Orensanz Foundation for the Arts. The special show was announced that day and a few hundred lucky fans were able to RSVP for free tickets.
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    Ocean's set was a mix of the strongest songs from 2011's nostalgia, ULTRA — "Novacane" and "Swim Good" — and new tracks from channel ORANGE.
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    Ocean also performed his beautiful reinterpretation of Coldplay's "Strawberry Swing," concluding it by recreating his hook from Watch The Throne's "Made In America."
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    Ocean closed his set with the nine-minute-long "Pyramids."
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    Audience members on the second-floor-balcony of the synagogue.
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    The show was filmed by The Fader, so we hope to see and hear some of the performance again.
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    The Angel Orensanz Foundation is located in a former synagogue in the heart of New York City's Lower East Side. Built in 1849, the building's design is meant to evoke the Sistine Chapel and the temple of Solomon.
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    The audience filled three levels in the intimate, 300-person capacity venue.
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    Bon Iver's staging was a stripped-down version of his recent tour set up, but he still managed to fit about a dozen band members on stage, including two drummers.
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    Bon Iver said it was an "honor to play on the same stage" as Frank Ocean.
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    Colin Stetson played baritone saxophone, alto saxophone and clarinet for Bon Iver.
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    Justin Vernon of Bon Iver.
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    Bon Iver closed the set with "The Wolves, Act I and II," leading the audience in a singalong of the refrain "What might have been lost" that continued well after he left the stage.
    Ryan Muir for NPR
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    This was the last live show in the U.S. from Bon Iver for a while. Vernon announced recently that the band will take some time off after their upcoming European tour.
    Ryan Muir for NPR

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Last night, two of today's most recognizable voices lifted the rafters of a glorious synagogue on New York's Lower East Side. The surprise show was announced with just about 12 hours notice, and lucky fans who answered an RSVP quickly filled the venue's few hundred spots.

Frank Ocean opened the night. His touring group is a sparse four-piece band and its restrained yet solid-in-the-pocket sound puts Ocean's voice front and center, just where it belongs. A few years ago, Bon Iver was so much about Justin Vernon's voice. Today, the band is a very different story, complex and dense sounding with Vernon only a part of a larger force.

The show was part of a series of concerts organized by The Fader and Vitaminwater which puts two theoretically different artists on the same stage on the same night — they play back to back sets, but don't collaborate. I walked away delighted to hear Bon Iver's last U.S. show for at least a while and happy to hear Frank Ocean for a third time on this tour, but was disappointed not to see the two headband-wearing performers on the same stage at the same time. We came so close to making a special evening the spark of something bigger. One can only hope.

Photographer, Ryan Muir, was able to capture the intimacy and majesty of the show. See some of our favorite pictures here and browse more at our Facebook page.

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