Nerds!

NPR Is Relocating: What's The Best Song About Moving On?

Editor's note: NPR is moving from its longtime home of 635 Mass. Ave. in Washington, D.C. to new digs a few blocks away. All the planning and packing has made NPR Music's Robin Hilton a bit reflect-y on all the time he's spent with the old building.


There's no easy way to tell you this. So I'm just going to come right out and say it: I've met someone new.

No, baby. Shh. Don't cry. You know how I hate to see you like this. Here. Take my handkerchief. There you go. See?

Of course I remember all the good times we had! You'll always be my little 635 Massachusetts Avenue NW. At least until a wrecking crew arrives in a few weeks and reduces you to a massive pile of shattered cinder blocks and old wiring. But what can I say? You had to know this couldn't go on forever.

Her name? What difference could that possibly make? It's nobody you know. She's totally new to town! Sigh. Alright, fine. It's 1111 North Capitol St. NE.

NPR's new home.

hide captionNPR's new home.

Stephen Voss/For NPR

I mean, what can I say? She's you 20 years ago.

Twenty years after if first opened, NPR's old headquarters is being torn down. The network is moving to a new building at 1111 North Capitol street NE.

hide captionTwenty years after if first opened, NPR's old headquarters is being torn down. The network is moving to a new building at 1111 North Capitol street NE.

Marie McGory/NPR

I know this hurts. But maybe the best way for you to understand is if I tell you in a song.

I think Zeppelin said it better than I ever could. I've just got to spread my wings and fly. I'd tell you to do the same but, again, the whole wrecking crew thing. So goodbye, old friend. It's been a sweet ride!

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What do you think is the best song about moving on? Tell us in the comments section or tweet @allsongs. We'll feature some of your picks on the last episode of All Songs Considered we'll record in the old NPR building.

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