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Neiman Marcus is testing a digital "Memory Mirror" that lets shoppers see how an outfit looks in back as well as displaying items they've tried on side by side. Courtesy of Neiman Marcus hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Neiman Marcus

About one-third of black and Hispanic teens say they're online just about all the time, compared with about 1 in 5 whites, a new study says. 27 Studios/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption 27 Studios/Getty Images

Artists in the residency program at Autodesk are given access to production-quality equipment in workshops, allowing them space to create at-will. Blake Marvin/Courtesy of Autodesk hide caption

itoggle caption Blake Marvin/Courtesy of Autodesk

More Americans are ditching traditional cash and plastic, opting instead for new mobile payment applications. But new research indicates cash isn't completely dead. Amy Sancetta/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Amy Sancetta/AP

Google is doing test flights of its balloons carrying Internet routers around the world. Last June, a balloon was released at the airport in Teresina, Brazil. Google hide caption

itoggle caption Google

Continuous Liquid Interface Production, or CLIP, uses liquid resin with ultraviolet light and oxygen projected through it to create more complex structures than those of existing 3-D printers. Nina Gregory/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Nina Gregory/NPR

DAR-1 is one of the many social robots with facial recognition abilities on display for the robot petting zoo at the South by Southwest interactive festival. Jack Plunkett/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jack Plunkett/AP

An attempt to build the perfect cockroach cyborg. Carlos Sanchez, Ph.D. student of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University hide caption

itoggle caption Carlos Sanchez, Ph.D. student of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University

Lincoln, Neb., is home to several startups, which use the city's low cost of living and high quality of life to attract workers. Nicolas Henderson/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Nicolas Henderson/Flickr

The new doughnut-shaped building will be a mile in circumference. "The office areas are laid out in little wedges all around the building," says Dan Whisenhunt, Apple's vice president of real estate and development. Anya Schultz/KQED hide caption

itoggle caption Anya Schultz/KQED