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Apple, which unveiled iOS 8 at June's Worldwide Developers Conference, says it will be technologically unfeasible for police to extract data from its new operating system. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Cyberstalking victims often don't know they're being tracked through their own phone because spyware apps like mSpy use misleading labels (labeled "android.sys.process" here) and don't take up much data. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Aarti Shahani/NPR

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks in Cupertino, Calif., on Tuesday. The company unveiled a new mobile payment system called Apple Pay, which uses security built into the latest iPhones. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Security expert Jose Molina discovered he could control "every device in every room" of a luxury hotel in China. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Aarti Shahani/NPR

After Grant Hernandez, an undergraduate security researcher at the University of Central Florida, hacked Nest, he programmed it to riff off a favorite line from the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey. Aarti Shahani hide caption

itoggle caption Aarti Shahani

A proposed law might determine what happens to our online accounts when we die. But the tech industry warns the measure could threaten the privacy of the deceased. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

A Google search removal request is displayed on the screen of a smartphone in London. The company says it has received more than 70,000 takedown requests following a European court ruling. Dominic Lipinski/PA Photos/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Dominic Lipinski/PA Photos/Landov

Journalist Brian Krebs spends time in the dark areas of the Internet, where hackers steal data off credit cards and sell the information in online underground stores. Krebs has learned computer code and how to get onto black market websites and cybercrime networks. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

By hijacking a user's computer, "bad" bots make it look as if she visits a website often, thus making the site more valuable to advertisers. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Military contractor Raytheon is marketing its employee surveillance software to smaller companies that handle big data. Raytheon hide caption

itoggle caption Raytheon