Weekend Mix: Los Massieras, Carla Morrison vs. Los Amparito And More

Los Massieras

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Los Massieras

1. Los Massieras, "Rumores"

Listen to while: Imagining the montage scene in a movie about '80s excess where things get really crazy.

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In this week's show, we talked a lot about how musically, there seems to be a period of rediscovering, remastering, remixing and covering the '80s. This is a good example. "Rumores" is obviously a track to listen to during the climax of your night, whether that on a dancefloor getting crazy, at a bar or on your couch. This track by Spain's Los Massieras is a cover of Italian TV personality Raffaella Carra's "Rumore." Much like the music, the video is like a Spandex-clad intergalactic voyage. One can only hope your weekend is, too.

2. Cienfue, "La Decima Tercera"

Listen to while: Taking a bike ride on Sunday

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Cienfue is considered by many to be one of the finest exponents of Panamanian rock music. He won us over with the way he embeds hard-rock riffs in Panamanian folk. This track, from his 2010 album La Calma Y La Tormenta, is called "The Thirteenth." Check out his gorgeous video, which pays homage to Panamanian tradition, with a thick guitar body and a constant, rapid heartbeat of traditional Panamanian drumming.

3. Los Amparito with Carla Morrison, "CuatrociƩnegas"

Listen to while: Lying on the grass on a sunny day, looking for shapes in the clouds.

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Let me start by introducing Carlos Pesina, a heavyweight in Mexican indie electronica. He goes by the aliases Los Amparito, Pepepe and Pesina Siller, and has made a name for himself by relocating traditional Mexican music in fantastical electronic landscapes. In fact, we recommend you check out his series Odio Los Jueves, in which once a week he introduces a new track or remix. So far, the series has delivered. In this track, Carla Morrison's ethereal voice is mixed in with sparse electronic beats and guitar pluckings. The video, which is nothing but shots of the sky while moving in a vehicle, is exactly what we had in mind for this song.

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